UFT sponsoring Sharpton rally - New York News

UFT sponsoring Sharpton rally

Posted: Updated:

The fallout from the death of Eric Garner has sparked a battle between teachers and police. Now there's new controversy over the decision by the teachers' union to sponsor a major rally protesting the death of Garner. And it's building momentum.

The Rev. Al Sharpton is expected to rally a crowd expected to number more than 15,000 people on Staten Island on Saturday. They will demand justice for Garner in the form of arrests of the police officers involved in his arrest. One of the sponsors is the United Federation of Teachers, or UFT, the union of more than 200,000 teachers and paraprofessionals.

Political analyst Basil Smikle says it is not unusual for the UFT to get involved in social action.

But this collaboration is raising concerns because the targets of the protest are police officers, who are also union members.

Sergeants Benevolent Association President Ed Mullins is outraged by UFT President Michael Mulgrew's decision. He called it disgraceful.

We reached out to the UFT, which sent a statement: "Saturday's march will be an opportunity to show the rest of the country that New York City is united in its belief in justice for all. We knew Yorkers will not be pitted against each other."

But PBA President Pat Lynch, whose union represents police officers, claims UFT's Mulgrew is wasting his members' money.

The rally Saturday is also expected to include family members of Michael Brown, the unarmed teen fatally shot by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.

 

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Islamic State group threat expanding

    Islamic State group threat expanding

    Wednesday, September 17 2014 6:09 AM EDT2014-09-17 10:09:36 GMT
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
    New York City has entered a "new era" of potential terror threats as hostilities between the United States and extremists from the Islamic State group intensify, Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday. Bratton told reporters that there is no current information pointing to a specific threat against the city.
  • Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Notes with swastikas and 'Uber' found in Brooklyn

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 10:05 PM EDT2014-09-17 02:05:20 GMT
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
    The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is working to track down whoever posted dozens of stickers and fliers with swastikas and the word "Uber" in Brooklyn. The stickers and flyers filled with images of hate were placed outside a Jewish boys' school on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. A Shomrim safety patrol spotted the stickers on the sidewalk and in the gutters, police said.
  • High-fiving strangers in NYC

    High-fiving strangers in NYC

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:01 PM EDT2014-09-16 22:01:29 GMT
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
    Looking for a taxi cab is a common sight in the city. For some people, an outstretched arm is usually the sign for hailing a cab. A few other folks see it as something else.Meet Meir Kalmanson. He sees a hand in the air as an opportunity to lighten up a person's serious or frantic state. Meir decided to high-five his way down Fifth Avenue. The video of his rebellion of social norms has gone viral.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices