Open carry gun law debate re-emerges after Colorado incident - New York News

Open carry gun law debate re-emerges after Colorado incident

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

A teen carried a 12-gauge shotgun through a Colorado town, then videotaped himself refusing a police request that he show them an ID. They arrested him, which has sparked a new round of debate about gun laws.

Steve Lohner showed reporters his Stoeger P-350 shotgun, the one he was carrying loaded when stopped by police in Aurora, Colorado.

Police asked, “Do you have a driver's license?”

To which Lohner responded yes, but when police asked to see it, he said no.

Lohner recorded his encounter with police, who said they'd been called by frightened residents. Aurora is where two years ago a deranged young gunman shot 82 people at a movie theater, killing 12.

“You look like you're 15 or 16. You don't look like you're 18. So, we don't even know if you can properly have that firearm,” the police told Lohner.

Though he refused to produce any ID, Lohner is 18 which is old enough in Colorado to openly carry a gun.

He was upset, though, that to get a permit to carry a handgun, he'd have to be 21. While he was arrested and charged with misdemeanor obstruction of an investigation, the dean of the IIT Chicago Kent College of Law thinks Lohner won't be convicted.

“This young man will get off. It's clear from the video that the cops were looking for any reason to stop him, because he was (making them angry),” said Dean Harold Krent.

Illinois law now forbids open carry of any firearm, though some gun rights activists want that to change. Applicants must be 21 or older for a license to carry a concealed and loaded handgun.

Illinois law also reads that, "upon the request of the (police) officer the licensee shall disclose...that he or she is in possession of a concealed firearm...present the license upon the request of the officer, and identify the location of the concealed firearm.”

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