Are tablets already on their way out? - New York News

iPad sales decline

Are tablets already on their way out?

Posted: Updated:
Apple Inc. photo Apple Inc. photo
NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Four years ago, tablet owners starting raving about the market's newest piece of mobile technology. Users like Nicole Wright and her 11-year-old son Kaleb haven't stopped.

"... Samsung Galaxy 4, mini iPad, the Samsung Galaxy Note, the Kindle Fire. There isn't a tablet I haven't had," Nicole says.

And, evidently, manufacturers of other devices noticed, enlarging their phone screens and slimming their laptops.

Last quarter, Apple iPad sales fell by 9 percent.

Some of the earliest tablet buyers we spoke to admitted to neglect:

"I never use it."

"I hardly use it."

"A laptop you have more flexibility to do work on than a tablet."

Still, forecasting the death of the tablet seems premature and incorrect. More likely, all our devices are cross-breeding and evolving until all our calling, emailing, texting, messaging, Internetting, TV watching, all our communication happens on one mobile gadget.

"Only if the device can be hyper-flexible and I literally mean flexible, like that you can bend it, so you can have it like this, you can roll it in your pocket, take a piece of it, put it on your wrist," Mashable's Lance Ulanoff says. "Until that happens -- and that's way out there -- we're still going to have different devices for different purposes."

Ulanoff includes the tablet among those different devices meeting any suggestion it might soon "die" with serious skepticism: "No, that's ridiculous."

For the decline in sales, Ulanoff blames market saturation -- those who want them have them -- and meticulous construction. Manufacturers built these to last, so they release upgrades less frequently than they might for cell phones.

When one considers the potential for growth in other countries, Ulanoff foresees a long life ahead for the tablet.

  • Your MoneyMore>>

  • Housing activists protest Airbnb

    Housing activists protest Airbnb

    Friday, September 12 2014 7:41 PM EDT2014-09-12 23:41:17 GMT
    You've probably seen Airbnb commercials extolling the benefits of homeowners renting out their houses or apartments to out-of-town guests for a fee. Sharing is caring feel-good commercials.But housing activists say Airbnb is reducing available housing in New York City's increasingly expensive and shrinking housing market. They argue Airbnb is pushing thousands of apartments toward use as illegal hotels instead of affordable housing.
    You've probably seen Airbnb commercials extolling the benefits of homeowners renting out their houses or apartments to out-of-town guests for a fee. Sharing is caring feel-good commercials.But housing activists say Airbnb is reducing available housing in New York City's increasingly expensive and shrinking housing market. They argue Airbnb is pushing thousands of apartments toward use as illegal hotels instead of affordable housing.
  • Robot workers are coming

    Robot workers are coming

    Friday, September 12 2014 7:13 PM EDT2014-09-12 23:13:15 GMT
    A life-sized looking and sounding robot named the RoboThespian is an interactive, alert machine powered by algorithms and codes -- a form of artificial intelligence. It's the sort of thing that would have sounded like science fiction a generation ago. These days, robots like this are used mostly in showrooms and for entertainment. But researcher Cadell Last of the Global Brain Institute says that these bots will have a much bigger role and will make up a major part of the workforce.
    A life-sized looking and sounding robot named the RoboThespian is an interactive, alert machine powered by algorithms and codes -- a form of artificial intelligence. It's the sort of thing that would have sounded like science fiction a generation ago. These days, robots like this are used mostly in showrooms and for entertainment. But researcher Cadell Last of the Global Brain Institute says that these bots will have a much bigger role and will make up a major part of the workforce.
  • Clothing for a cause

    Clothing for a cause

    Friday, September 12 2014 7:00 PM EDT2014-09-12 23:00:07 GMT
    Like millions of Americans, John Williams has been out of work for months. He has finally landed an interview for a customer service position. To make sure he gets the job, he is making sure to look his best, thanks to Suited for Work.Suited for Work is a program under FEGS, a nonprofit that's been around for 80 years. Since its inception, Suited for Work has outfitted more than 8,000 men with brand-new suits donated by manufacturers.
    Like millions of Americans, John Williams has been out of work for months. He has finally landed an interview for a customer service position. To make sure he gets the job, he is making sure to look his best, thanks to Suited for Work.Suited for Work is a program under FEGS, a nonprofit that's been around for 80 years. Since its inception, Suited for Work has outfitted more than 8,000 men with brand-new suits donated by manufacturers.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices