WSU student killed in crash, emergency crews fail to cover car - New York News

WSU student killed in crash, emergency crews fail to cover car for hours

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DETROIT (WJBK) - Diamond Scott was a student at Wayne State University who recently accepted a job in Baton Rouge as a social worker. On Monday, she died in a car crash in Detroit near Greenfield Road and Curtis.

As Diamond's family arrived on the scene they were shocked to see her dead body behind the wheel. For some reason, emergency crews on the scene failed to cover the car with a tarp for more than four hours.

Fox 2 is working to find out why it took so long to secure the accident scene. Detroit Police do not have tarps in their response vehicles. The Detroit Fire Department or the Medical Examiner's Office usually provides this service.  Why did it take so long on Monday?

Play the video to see Roop Raj's full report from the scene.>>

Raj called the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office when he first arrived on the scene and discovered that the vehicle carrying Diamond was still uncovered. 

While Roop was on the phone, a bystander heard him talking and that gentleman walked to a nearby Home Depot and bought a tarp to cover the car.

Diamond was on her way to pick up her mother who was returning from a church trip to Chicago. The two talked on the phone just a few minutes before the crash. Police say the driver of a another car, a Ford Taurus, ran a stop light and crashed into the driver's side of Diamond's car.

Her mother says Diamond loved everybody and she was set to donate a kidney to a member of her church.

A fund has been set up in her memory. Donations can be made at any PNC Bank, under the Diamond Scott Memorial Fund.

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