Project H.O.M.E. Providing Support For Homeless In Philadelphia - New York News

ADVERTISEMENT
Bookmark and Share

Project H.O.M.E. Providing Support For Homeless In Philadelphia

Posted: Updated:
PHILADELPHIA -

The City of Brotherly Love is home to one of the highest poverty rates in the country at 26 percent.

But a program in Philadelphia just got a lot of money, helping it put food in the mouths of the homeless and doubling the number of apartments it can offer.

Project H.O.M.E. has helped some 8,500 people get off the streets and ultimately lead new lives with affordable apartments, job opportunities, a learning center and a free healthcare clinic.

Raising money to fight homelessness is difficult. Often times potential big private donors don't donate because they think the problem is too overwhelming and it's the responsibility of the government to solve.

But Project H.O.M.E. is convincing donors otherwise and has received a $30-million donation, one of the largest in homeless philanthropy.

"Most people, when they see someone living on the street, are moved by the plight of people living there and want to know what they can do. And the solution can only be a public-private partnership. One or the other cannot solve this problem alone," said co-founder of Project H.O.M.E., Sister Mary Scullion.

Sam Santiago is a retired cop. He spends his days searching for homeless people in need of Project H.O.M.E.'s help. He offers water, blankets, but it's all with the hope of ultimately convincing them to accept long-term help.

"You know that it's not easy, but you also know that you are probably the only contact that these folks on the street might have with medical stuff, with the V.A., with housing at some point," said Santiago.

David Brown lived on the streets for 25 years. He couldn't read or write. But today he lives in an apartment and works at Project H.O.M.E.'s clothing store.

"If you understand the words of Project H.O.M.E., then you understand their mission. Like the H is for housing, the O is for opportunity, the M is for medical and the E is for education. If you give a homeless person them four things, he won't be homeless no longer," said Brown.

From 2012 to 2013, Philadelphia's homeless population declined by 2.3 percent.

During that time, homelessness rose by 27 percent in Los Angeles and 13 percent in New York, FOX News' Bryan Llenas reported.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • The Big Idea

    Making New York City more energy efficient

    Making New York City more energy efficient

    Friday, July 25 2014 8:45 PM EDT2014-07-26 00:45:49 GMT
    More than half the population of New York City rides public transportation to work. No other metropolis in this country even approaches that percentage or the MTA's total number of riders. For that reason, New York likely ranks as the most energy-efficient city in the nation. But what would it take to make the city even more energy-efficient or even self-sufficient?
    More than half the population of New York City rides public transportation to work. No other metropolis in this country even approaches that percentage or the MTA's total number of riders. For that reason, New York likely ranks as the most energy-efficient city in the nation. But what would it take to make the city even more energy-efficient or even self-sufficient?
  • Another company to give family free cruise

    Family of 5-year-old with cancer upset with cruise line

    Family of 5-year-old with cancer upset with cruise line

    Friday, July 25 2014 6:52 PM EDT2014-07-25 22:52:08 GMT
    A Long Island family is upset that a cruise line won't accommodate them after their 5-year-old son had to have emergency surgery for cancer. Nicolas Colucci and the rest of his family was supposed to go on a cruise on the Norwegian Breakaway. They did not buy travel insurance, so Norwegian says they cannot rebook the cruise so close to departure. The CEO of a rival cruise line saw their story and reached out to the Colucci family to offer them a free cruise.
    A Long Island family is upset that a cruise line won't accommodate them after their 5-year-old son had to have emergency surgery for cancer. Nicolas Colucci and the rest of his family was supposed to go on a cruise on the Norwegian Breakaway. They did not buy travel insurance, so Norwegian says they cannot rebook the cruise so close to departure. The CEO of a rival cruise line saw their story and reached out to the Colucci family to offer them a free cruise.
  • Hudson River Sloop Clearwater

    Pete Seeger's environmental legacy lives on

    Pete Seeger's environmental legacy lives on

    Friday, July 25 2014 6:16 PM EDT2014-07-25 22:16:30 GMT
    American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger's passion for music and the environment embodied who he was every single day of his life. In 1966, Seeger co-founded the organization Hudson River Sloop Clearwater. Ever since, Seeger's 106-foot-long sloop, Clearwater, has been sailing up and down the Hudson River to educate and inspire children to protect the environment.
    American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger's passion for music and the environment embodied who he was every single day of his life. In 1966, Seeger co-founded the organization Hudson River Sloop Clearwater. Ever since, Seeger's 106-foot-long sloop, Clearwater, has been sailing up and down the Hudson River to educate and inspire children to protect the environment.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices