Arizona town protests US border patrol presence - New York News

Arizona town protests US border patrol presence

Posted: Updated:
  • ImmigrationMore>>

  • Coalition sues over immigrants' access to lawyers

    Coalition sues over immigrants' access to lawyers

    Friday, August 22 2014 6:46 PM EDT2014-08-22 22:46:04 GMT
    A coalition of lawyers filed a lawsuit Friday to halt the quick deportation of Central American woman and children, saying immigrants at a New Mexico detention center don't have proper access to lawyers and are...
    A coalition of lawyers filed a lawsuit Friday to halt the quick deportation of Central American women and children, saying immigrants at a New Mexico detention center don't have proper access to lawyers and are being...
  • Obama weighs broader move on legal immigration

    Obama weighs broader move on legal immigration

    Wednesday, August 20 2014 5:04 PM EDT2014-08-20 21:04:55 GMT
    President Barack Obama is considering key changes in the legal immigration system requested by tech, industry and powerful interest groups.
    President Barack Obama is considering key changes in the nation's immigration system requested by tech, industry and powerful interest groups, in a move that could blunt Republicans' election-year criticism of the...
  • Immigrants found in back of locked rental truck

    Immigrants found in back of locked rental truck

    Federal officials say nine immigrants who entered the United States illegally were found locked inside the cargo area of a rental truck at a Border Patrol checkpoint in southern Arizona.
    Federal officials say nine immigrants who entered the United States illegally were found locked inside the cargo area of a rental truck at a Border Patrol checkpoint in southern Arizona.
By ASTRID GALVAN
Associated Press

AMADO, Ariz. (AP) -- Some 20 miles north of where the U.S. and Mexico meet, near a small town in Arizona, a makeshift border patrol checkpoint that went up about 7 years ago and was supposed to be temporary continues to draw ire from residents who say their rights are being violated.

The residents of Arivaca, Arizona, have coalesced to not only protest the small checkpoint located on a two-lane road of the same name but also to monitor encounters border agents have when drivers pass through. The checkpoint has helped deter drug and human smugglers from the area, border agents say.

On Wednesday, half a dozen of them sat about 150 feet from where agents ask drivers to stop and divulge their citizenship status, the standard protocol for agents at all checkpoints and ports of entry. Under an unusually overcast sky, Patty Miller wrote down observations about the types of cars that were passing through, the people in them and their apparent interaction with the border patrol.

Standing behind her was Carlota Wray, a decades-long Arivaca resident and U.S. citizen who says she's been harassed by border agents on several occasions. She used binoculars to get a closer look at the agents, handing off descriptions to her fellow activist.

"We're just standing here for our rights as citizens," Wray said.

The goal, Wray said, was for the checkpoint to be removed.

"It has a bad impact on our little town. And it's a good town," she said.

About 600 people live in Arivaca, an unincorporated area a few miles southwest of the checkpoint.

Residents say they feel it's unnecessary and invasive when they have to stop at a checkpoint and declare their citizenship status every time they leave town, whether it be to get groceries at the Walmart in nearby Green Valley or to visit a doctor. Children are bused through the checkpoints daily because there are no schools in Arivaca.

"They're having a civics lesson, but I'm not sure it's the one we want them to have," Leesa Jacobson, another activist, said. "We are not a war zone."

But border patrol agents say the checkpoints are a crucial deterrent for drug and human smugglers. The agency is legally allowed to have in-land checkpoints within a 100-mile air radius of the actual border.

Tucson Sector border agents on June 27 encountered drug smugglers who averted the checkpoint near Arivaca and instead drove through a local ranch just south of it. After a short chase, the suspects fled the car but left behind more than 1,200 pounds of marijuana.

"Checkpoints play a vital role in the Tucson Sector. Smugglers often attempt to subvert checkpoint operations by attempting to traffic drugs and people through outlying areas. The disregard for public safety and private property in this smuggling attempt demonstrates the callousness of the smugglers," the Tucson sector wrote in a statement.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Didn't find what
you were looking for?

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Superstorm Sandy

    Grimm criticizes storm recovery program

    Grimm criticizes storm recovery program

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 9:06 PM EDT2014-08-28 01:06:30 GMT
    When Superstorm Sandy destroyed Maureen Childs' Staten Island home, she turned to New York City's Build it Back program for help. She says what she got back was heartache. At a news conference Wednesday, Rep. Michael Grimm, who represents Staten Island and part of Brooklyn, highlighted what he called failures in a program designed to help victims of Sandy get back on their feet.
    When Superstorm Sandy destroyed Maureen Childs' Staten Island home, she turned to New York City's Build it Back program for help. She says what she got back was heartache. At a news conference Wednesday, Rep. Michael Grimm, who represents Staten Island and part of Brooklyn, highlighted what he called failures in a program designed to help victims of Sandy get back on their feet.
  • GIRLTALK #takeover

    Angela Simmons reaches out

    Angela Simmons reaches out

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 7:09 PM EDT2014-08-27 23:09:20 GMT
    The Boys and Girls Club of Newark seems like the last place you'd expect to find the daughter of hip hop royalty. But when it comes to inspiring young girls, Angela Simmons, daughter of Rev. Run of Run DMC, believes in the old adage "each one, teach one." While it may seem like she had a silver spoon in her mouth, she knows the importance of giving back.
    The Boys and Girls Club of Newark seems like the last place you'd expect to find the daughter of hip hop royalty. But when it comes to inspiring young girls, Angela Simmons, daughter of Rev. Run of Run DMC, believes in the old adage "each one, teach one." While it may seem like she had a silver spoon in her mouth, she knows the importance of giving back.
  • NYSE rings bell for pediatric cancer awareness

    NYSE rings bell for pediatric cancer awareness

    Wednesday, August 27 2014 7:00 PM EDT2014-08-27 23:00:54 GMT
    On Wednesday, the world famous New York Stock Exchange closing bell rang in honor of pediatric cancer awareness. The Loccisano family says their beloved Frankie heard the bell all the way up in heaven. Frankie's grandmother says she is convinced of it. Camille Loccisano, Frankie's mother, is the executive director of Frankie's Mission, a nonprofit pediatric cancer foundation named in her son's honor.
    On Wednesday, the world famous New York Stock Exchange closing bell rang in honor of pediatric cancer awareness. The Loccisano family says their beloved Frankie heard the bell all the way up in heaven. Frankie's grandmother says she is convinced of it. Camille Loccisano, Frankie's mother, is the executive director of Frankie's Mission, a nonprofit pediatric cancer foundation named in her son's honor.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices