Smithsonian brings the past to life with 3D printing - New York News

Smithsonian brings the past to life with 3D printing

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

For 9 years, Vincent Rossi worked building wooden models at the Smithsonian Institute.

A place where history is taught every day.

“I’ve always thought that to really engage in the history of America and the world and the natural world you need to be able to touch it" Rossi said.

Which is why he recently abandoned woodworking for the new world of 3D laser printing; a technologically advanced method of re-creating historical objects.

Rossi says 3D printing is now so precise, it is transforming the way we as human beings relate to our past.

“So they put plaster on top of Abraham Lincoln’s face they caste that same object out of plaster and then our team 3D scanned it and created a 3D print that you are holding in your hands” Rossi said.

3D printing has also allowed historians to replicate exact models of Amelia Earhart’s flight suit, and touch the trigger of David Livingstone’s rifle.

It is also enabling reconstruction of dinosaur fossils according to Smithsonian digitization expert Adam Metallo.

“People are thrilled to be able to hold Smithsonian collections in their hand so that's something that's really been a game changer” Metallo said.

The Smithsonian is also allowing the laser information to be downloaded off their website.

Rossi says anyone can have anyone can now have historical objects in their homes.

“So essentially we are taking down the walls of the Smithsonian we are allowing people to download the data so they can 3D print it" he said.

Printing historical objects now has the potential to bring history to life in a way never experienced before.

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