Can We Be A Little Smarter About Our Smartphones? - New York News

Can We Be A Little Smarter About Our Smartphones?

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When Carolyn McGuire's iPhone was stolen the very same day she bought it, she didn't know about all the  GPS tracking app's that are no so popular like ''find my iPhone ''.  Once installed, your iPhone can be located wherever it is simply by logging into another device and watching it ''beep'' on a map. 

It works if you left it at your friend's house, if you left it in the bathroom in a restaurant, or it's in the living room of a gang of thieves who make a living selling stolen phones.The danger of course, is if it happens to be in the possession of a criminal, going after it yourself poses a certain risk, but we hear report after report of people doing just that, at great personal peril.

Carolyn, a rock solid personal trainer with apparently no fear,  said if her phone had that app when it was stolen ''I'd go after it like a hawk.  That phone is my child.''  Ahh yes, that's the problem isn't it. Our phones aren't just phones. They contain essential information about our lives. But are they worth our lives? No.  That's why Naomi MiIler, a more sensible sounding Brit who teaches autistic children, would not take on the role of cell phone vigilante, in fact her phone was already stolen once and she simply reported it to police. She put It this way  "There's an element of personal safety you cant just go to someone's house and demand your phone back. ''  Well, you can, but again, that's the point. Police don't advise it. What the LAPD told me was that if your phone is stolen, and it wasn't part of some major home burglary or an assault , that you have to go to the Police station and file a written report. If you can provide the Police with the location of your phone they will handle it, but they won't say precisely when. Obviously in a city like L.A. this might not be the highest priority for detectives, so you'll have to be persistent, or you'll have to do it yourself, so therein lies the dilemma. Of course I have a better idea.  Don't leave your phone lying around to get stolen in the first place.  Think of it like your wallet, or in Caroline's case, your child.

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