Thank 'Ewe' to Mom on Mother's Day - New York News

Thank 'Ewe' to Mom on Mother's Day

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WJBK - The humanitarian agency, World Vision, is asking shoppers to say "Thank EWE" to Mom this Mother's Day by giving the gift of a sheep in her honor to a family in need.

This is the humanitarian agencies first ever Mothers Day Gift Catalog and it features animals and more than 250 gifts that benefit impoverished families internationally and right here in the U.S.

You can give the gift in the name of a loved one and print a special card online that explains how their gift is changing a life. (Which also makes it a great last-minute gift idea!)

Why give a sheep this Mother's Day?

Each year Americans spend $671 million on Mother's Day cards alone, according to the National Retail Federation; for that same amount of money, consumers could provide more than 5 million sheep to families in need around the world.

Mother's Day is the second largest consumer spending holiday in the United States, in an effort to make these dollars "do good," the first-ever World Vision 'Mothers Day Gift Catalog letshopperss say "Thank Ewe, Mom" by donating a sheep in her honor.

Why a Ewe?

For $126, one ewe (a female sheep) gives nourishment and income to a mother and her children.

One healthy ewe provides up to a half gallon of highly nutritious milk with essential protein, vitamins and minerals, plus plenty of wool to knit clothing and blankets.

The family can sell the surplus at the market to earn money to buy school supplies for their children, buy medicine, or other necessities.

The fertilizer from sheep can also increase the amount of vegetables grown in a family's garden.

The best part about these gifts is that they are self-sustainable. For example, sheep given to communities in Africa are purchased in Africa. They grow and multiply and the offspring are often shared with neighbors and ultimately make a better life for the whole village.

How does the Gift Catalog work?

Through World Vision's Gift Catalog you can donate animals like sheep, goats, cows, and chickens on behalf of someone in need around the world.

The gifts range in price from $16 to $39,000, but there are many affordable items for $35 or less.

Goats are one of the most popular gifts in World Vision's Gift Catalog. For $75 you can give a goat and help save a child's life.

A special card describing the impact of your gift can be sent or can be printed online in minutes before serving Mom breakfast in bed.

How can I give?

You can make a difference this Mother's Day by placing a order with World Vision's Gift Catalog online at www.worldvisiongifts.org or calling 855-WV GIFTS


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