Wildfire season starts early in Arizona - New York News

3 fires start within 48 hours in Flagstaff; residents asked to be on the lookout

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FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -

Wildfire season is here in Arizona and it's getting off to an early start.

Several small fires have popped up around the state in just the past few days -- including three within the last two days in an area outside of Flagstaff -- and that has officials worried.

A lot of people are asking, is this arson?

The Flagstaff Fire Department says no, they can't say that yet, but this is peculiar.

These fires -- popping up since Friday in a four square mile area right around Flagstaff -- a city built in the forest.  During dry conditions, add high winds and you can see why the Flagstaff Fire Department is putting residents on alert.

People living along Switzer Canyon realized Friday that the fire that started in the forest behind their neighborhood could reach their homes.

"It was really windy and really gusting.. once it got the trees, it seems like.. it going to go at any second," said Nick Brown.

It's easy to see why people are so concerned -- the fire sparked close to homes.

In a four square mile area, the fire department says this is one of three fires that started within 48 hours -- that's alarming.

"It's not child's play when you start talking about fires close to homes with all sorts of different types of fuel around.. big trees, tall grass, twigs.. burns very quickly, very fast," said Capt. Johnson of the Flagstaff Fire Department.

Johnson says they are asking residents to be on the lookout.

"If you see smoke -- more than a barbecue, most likely it's a fire and call 911. Get it called in quickly so we can get there first."

FFD says they are ready for the season ahead.  They've been training and are prepared.

The last thing any one wants is for someone to be setting the fires on purpose, but they are investigating.  If you see anything suspicious, call 911.

 

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