Addictive new 'numbers' app - New York News

Addictive new 'numbers' app

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

There's a new addictive gaming app for your cell phone.

And it doesn't feature birds or candy.

It’s all about numbers!

The free app called 2048 doesn't involve any graphics or colors like you've seen with Flappy Bird and Candy Crush.

Just like Flappy Bird, it looks utterly simple but far from being simple.

It is free. It is addicting. It is frustrating.

The game demands a lot of patience and gray matter working to win.

Those who will be playing on their computers just need to press the arrow keys while those on their mobile devices will have to just swipe their screens to move the "2," "4", "8," "16," and so on tiles to add them up together .

So, if the gamer can move the "2" and "2" next to each other and push one to the other, that will add up to become "4."

Player needs to do that to matching tiles until one tile shows "2048."

There are no Super Mario green pipes or a cityscape background but just like Flappy Bird, 2048 is designed to be frustrating enough.

Players will not see a bird hitting a pipe or hearing a thud as it falls flat face to the ground but the screen will simply show "Game Over"-- over and over again until you solve the puzzle.

The new gaming craze was created by Gabriele Cirulli, a young programmer who lives in northern Italy. The game clearly takes inspiration from Veewo Studio's 1024 and Asher Vollmer's Threes.

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