New research on obesity fattens up - New York News

New research on obesity fattens up

Updated:

By: Herb Scribner, Deseret News

Fries and pies aren't the only reasons Americans are obese.

Salon recently unveiled five reasons Americans are obese, and few of them have to do with real food products. The list included antibiotics, livestock fatteners and pesticides. Sugar substitutes are also culprits, as is the marketing of food products.

“Americans have become huge,” Martha Rosenberg wrote on Salon. “Between the 1960s and the 2000s, Americans grew, on the average, an inch taller and 24 pounds heavier. The average American man today weighs 194 pounds and the average woman 165 pounds. The growing girth has led to the creation of special-sized ambulances, operating tables and coffins as well as bigger seats on planes and trains.

"Almost a third of American children and teens are overweight, but 84 percent of parents believe their children are at a healthy weight in one study. Why? The adults are probably overweight too. Still there are scientific reasons why Americans are blimping up and they aren't limited to eating too much and exercising too little.”

Mississippi was recently named the most obese state in the country, according to The Washington Post, with 35.4 percent of the state being overweight. West Virginia, Delaware, Louisiana and Arkansas rounded out the top five of that list, which was put together by a Gallup-Healthways survey. And obesity has cost effects, too, the Post said.

“Research has shown that the average health-care costs for an obese individual are over $1,300 more annually than (for) someone who is not obese,” said James E. Pope, chief science officer at Healthways in a statement, according to The Post. “Although slowing, and even reversing, this trend may seem daunting, even modest weight loss of 5 percent to 10 percent of initial body weight can lower the health risks associated with obesity.”

Obesity has also been linked to ovarian cancer and lower grades for teen girls.

"If you're rewarded with grades and success, then you're less dependent on fries and cheese doodles, frankly," said David Katz, director of Yale University's Prevention Research Center, to NPR. "And if your (grades) are not good or rewarding, you don't have to be depressed to be frustrated - and for your self-esteem to plummet. And food may be a solution (you turn to)."

So what are some ways to combat obesity? BBC News recently reported that researchers in the United Kingdom are looking at limiting the number of takeout restaurants surrounding workplaces, which will help cut down on obesity rates.

"Our research," said Dr. Thomas Burgoine, who led a study by Cambridge University that looked at workers’ consumption of takeout food, "suggests that policies to make our neighborhood more healthy by restricting access to takeaway food might be successful."


Original Post

Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Smoking rates on the rise in New York City

    Smoking rates on the rise in New York City

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 7:03 AM EDT2014-09-16 11:03:52 GMT
    For the first time in years, more than 1 million New Yorkers are smoking, marking a disturbing rise of tobacco use in the city that pioneered a number of anti-smoking initiatives that were emulated nationally.  Sixteen percent of adult New Yorkers smoked in 2013, up from 14 percent in 2010, which was the city's lowest recorded rate, according to the findings released by New York City's Department of Health.
    For the first time in years, more than 1 million New Yorkers are smoking, marking a disturbing rise of tobacco use in the city that pioneered a number of anti-smoking initiatives that were emulated nationally.  Sixteen percent of adult New Yorkers smoked in 2013, up from 14 percent in 2010, which was the city's lowest recorded rate, according to the findings released by New York City's Department of Health.
  • Enterovirus outbreak hits New York

    Enterovirus outbreak hits New York

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:26 AM EDT2014-09-16 10:26:36 GMT
    The New York Health Department has confirmed that a viral-based severe respiratory illness has sickened several children in the state. New York is the latest state to confirm cases of sickness caused by enterovirus EV-D68. More than a dozen children are sick, officials said. The CDC has said this unusually severe outbreak has caused serious breathing problems.
    The New York Health Department has confirmed that a viral-based severe respiratory illness has sickened several children in the state. New York is the latest state to confirm cases of sickness caused by enterovirus EV-D68. More than a dozen children are sick, officials said. The CDC has said this unusually severe outbreak has caused serious breathing problems.
  • Police-involved shooting in Rutherford

    Police-involved shooting in Rutherford

    Tuesday, September 16 2014 6:04 AM EDT2014-09-16 10:04:16 GMT
    At least one suspect was shot in a police-involved shooting in Rutherford, New Jersey. The shooting occurred at about 2:30 a.m. at Rutherford Ave. and Ridge Rd. A tweet from Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli read that the shooting may have involved Lyndhurst Police and a State Trooper.
    At least one suspect was shot in a police-involved shooting in Rutherford, New Jersey. The shooting occurred at about 2:30 a.m. at Rutherford Ave. and Ridge Rd. A tweet from Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli read that the shooting may have involved Lyndhurst Police and a State Trooper.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices