Daylight Saving Time: Questions Answered - New York News

Daylight Saving Time: Questions Answered

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It's that time of year again when we mess around with our clocks.

Daylight Saving Time (DST) begins Sunday, March. 9th at 2 a.m. So remember to set your clocks forward one hour.

That means you are going to lose an hour of sleep. So you may want to try to go to bed earlier.

But why do we turn our clocks ahead?

Here is everything you need to know about Daylight Savings Time as described from the National Institute of Standards and Technology's website.

What is Daylight Saving Time?

DST is the time of year when we move our clocks one hour ahead in order to attain an extra hour of sunlight during the day.

The end of DST to Standard Time, or ST, comes at this time of year, fall. Clocks are moved back and an hour of daylight is lost in the evening.

When is Daylight Saving Time?

In 1918, the United States government introduced DST to the nation. It is effective for 238 days during the year and begins the second Sunday in March at 2 a.m., and ends the first Sunday in November at 2 a.m.

Just remember the old adage, "spring forward, fall back."

Why is there Daylight Saving Time?

DST was begun as a way to save energy. Advocates believe that by having an extra hour of daylight in the warmer summer and spring months, people will be more likely to go outside and not use up energy in their homes, the FAQ page of NIST.gov explained.

Where is Daylight Saving Time followed / not followed?

Forty-eight of the 50 states follow DST. The two states that do not are Arizona and Hawaii. Indiana changed over to DST in 2006. American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands also do not observe DST.

What are the current rules for Daylight Saving Time?

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 changed the rules of DST for the first time in 20 years. The United States Naval Observatory says that in the beginning of 2007, DST changed from starting the first Sunday in April to beginning the second Sunday in March.

In addition, DST initially ended the last Sunday in October, but was lengthened to ending the first Sunday in November instead.

So this Sunday remember to set your clocks a head an hour at 2 a.m. Standard Time in whatever time zone you are in.

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