6 tips to make waking up easier - New York News

6 tips to make waking up easier

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By: Amanda Hollman, KSL

Let's face it, waking up in the morning can often be a challenge, especially when you have to be up early. It's the fight that so many of us are familiar with between the warm, comfy bed and the annoying alarm that demands you get up.

Mornings don't have to be such a challenge though. There are many ways to cut out some of the morning grogginess, but here are six of the most common methods.

1. Get on a schedule

Humans have a natural "body clock" called the circadian rhythm, which is your body's timing of sleepiness and wakefulness. If it gets thrown off it can cause lots of issues, which includes struggles with waking up.

If you go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day, your body will set your internal clock according to that schedule and it'll be easier to wake up and to get to sleep.

The best way to set your bedtime schedule is according to sleep cycles. The first cycle is about 70-100 minutes and the following cycles are 90-120 minutes. Use a sleep calculator to plan your sleep schedule, and getting up in the morning will be easier.

2. Crack the blinds

Your internal clock is also affected by natural light, since our bodies are hard-wired to get up with the sun. There are all kinds of natural light devices that gradually get brighter to help you wake up, though these can get pricey. An easy and inexpensive way is to crack the blinds to the window in your bedroom and let the sun come in on its own.

3. Don't push snooze

As tempting as it is to push it, just don't. Your brain will start another sleep cycle and when the alarm goes off it'll interrupt the incomplete cycle, which makes you more tired than if you had just gotten up the first time.

Putting your alarm in a spot where you have to get out of bed to reach it can help with not pushing the snooze button. It also is a good motivator to not go back to sleep since you're already out of bed.

4. Get active

Exercise is probably the last thing on your mind when you wake up in the morning but it gets the blood flowing and makes your brain more alert. It doesn't have to be an extensive workout or for very long, just as long as you move. You can go on a walk, a short run, yoga or even stretching.

5. Freshen up

Whether you take a shower or just wash your face in the morning, the change in temperature and the refreshing water can wake up your senses. A cold shower increases blood circulation and contracts muscles, which releases toxins. Plus the change in temperature will awaken your senses.

6. Eat breakfast

After not eating for hours since you ate dinner, your body needs food in the morning to have the energy to get through the day. Eating breakfast will help ward off hunger, especially when you have a little lean protein like eggs.


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