Celebrity news outlets agree to 'no kids' photo policy - New York News

Celebrity news outlets agree to 'no kids' photo policy

Updated:

By: Kandra Polatis, Deseret News

Popular entertainment outlets such as People magazine, "Entertainment Tonight" and the "Today Show" have pledged to stop publishing photos of stars' children without parental consent because of a new movement led by celebrity couple Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard.

"I don't want strange men violating my child for money," Bell told "Entertainment Tonight." She explained that celebrities have difficulty taking their children anywhere because of the paparazzi. "Running red lights, honking, screaming stuff out the window - it's a James Bond movie where you are actually being hunted. It's not OK when there's kids around," said Bell.

Bell and Shepard said many of their celebrity friends, including Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston, Bradley Cooper, Michelle Williams, Amy Adams, Katie Holmes and Scarlett Johansson (who does not have kids), would boycott celebrity news outlets that do not agree to a "no kids" policy, reports the Washington Post.

Bell and Shepard are not the only celebrities that have led crusades against the "pedorazzi." In September 2013, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed an anti-paparazzi bill that was written to protect celebrity children.

Actresses Jennifer Garner and Halle Berry spoke in support of the bill before it became law. "(The paparazzi) are allowed to be so close to (my daughter) that they can shout obscenities to me and ask her questions that are inappropriate for a 5-year-old to have to answer," Berry said in front of a California Assembly Committee, according to the Sacramento Bee.

However, Bell and Shepard's campaign is different from prior famous parents' efforts because when entertainment sources adhere to the "no kids" photo policy, they remove the paparazzi's motivation to snap photos of celebrities' kids for money, explained Emily Yahr at the Washington Post.

People's editorial director Jess Cagle said her magazine was signing on to the policy because they sympathize with celebrity parents' desire to protect their children.

However, Cagle added this caveat: "We have no interest in running kids' photos taken under duress. Of course, there may be rare exceptions based on the newsworthiness of photos. And there's always the tough balancing act we face when dealing with stars who exploit their children one day and complain about loss of privacy the next."


Original Post

Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

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