NFL star Richie Incognito explains what happened to his car - New York News

NFL star Richie Incognito explains what happened to his car

Posted: Updated: Feb 27, 2014 09:46 PM
PHOENIX (KSAZ) -

FOX 10 EXCLUSIVE

A bizarre discovery in a Scottsdale neighborhood, a $300,000 Ferrari parked half on the lawn half on the rocks with serious damage. Someone took a bat to it but no one was around to claim it and no one reported it to police. Eventually police did locate the owner, controversial NFL lineman Richie Incognito.

Incognito has been accused of harassment, making racist comments, and bullying a teammate.
    
FOX 10 spoke with Richie Incognito Thursday. Despite his reputation as being a mean player with anger management issues he was welcoming, polite, and candid about what happened.

When asked about the damages and the baseball bat in the grill he responded with, "Oh that was that was just me venting, that was self expression, that's a piece of art. The happiest day of my life was when I got that car and now the second happiest day will be when I donate it to charity," said Richie Incognito.

NFL player Richie Incognito admited to taking a bat to his own Ferrari. TMZ posted images of the damage the car parked sideways on the front lawn of his Scottsdale home with dents on the hood and part of a baseball bat lodged in the grill.

Incognito welcomed us inside his home to explain what happened. "Hi it's all right, come on my property, sorry to bother you umm.. come on in it's safe," he said.

This is the latest in a string of bizarre incidents involving Incognito who some have labeled the "NFL bully". He has been accused of harassing fellow teammate Jonathan Martin to the point that Martin left the Miami Dolphins organization. In an exclusive interview with FOX 10 he opened up for the first time since an NFL investigation confirmed the allegations.

"When things went down it was just unfortunate. Me and my dad, my mom, my brother, Jonathan Martin, the Dolphins, Stephen Ross, you we're all brothers and sisters. I think we all understand that its just time to move on. You know words were said, things were done, but at the end of the day we're all brothers and sisters and we're here to lift each other up. We're here to motivate each other that's something my dad instilled in me a long time ago he's from a military background so we have some odd ways of training," he said.
    
When asked what his plans were now, he said "Just hanging out and moving on. I'm relaxing and just enjoying this nice weather, going to take my dad and brothers to baseball games".

His Ferrari now sits covered in his garage. Incognito happily posed for a photo of him sitting on top of it and while he declined to take the cover off and reveal what led to the bashing he said he hopes to turn this bad incident into something positive.

"The Ferrari is a story unto itself, the Ferrari is one entity, but I will tell you this the Ferrari is going to be for sale through my mission which is helping the brotherhood, whatever brotherhood it is," he said.

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