Dr. Jen Talks About New Drinking Craze Sweeping Internet - New York News

Dr. Jen Talks About New Drinking Craze Sweeping Internet

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PHILADELPHIA -

A dangerous drinking game is sweeping the world and even claiming the lives of several men who have attempted it.

It's called "Neknomination," short for neck and nominate. The new game has taken off on the Internet after starting in Australia.

Basically, people post videos of themselves downing a lot of alcohol and doing a crazy stunt.

Then, these people dare or "nominate" other people to top them. Those nominated have 24 hours to complete the challenge.

The stunts have gotten more and more outrageous, as some people are adding eggs, motor oil or even a dead mouse to their booze, while others are drinking out of a toilet.

 Dr. Jen was on Good Day to explain why this trend is so deadly for teens.

Downing a lot of alcohol in a short period of time is very dangerous.

"Alcohol is a Central Nervous System depressant," explained Dr. Jen. "It affects every organ in the body, and your body can only metabolize…deal with a certain amount of alcohol."

The CDC recommends no more than one drink per day, for women, and two drinks per day, for men.

What is binge drinking?

  • Five or more drinks in two to three hour time for men
  • Four or more drinks in two to three hour time for women.

Any binge drinking is dangerous, and it is what we're seeing in these Neknomination videos, Dr. Jen tells Good Day.

How to stop this? Dr. Jen thinks education is key.

In good news, some South Africans have decided to turn the craze into a "random act of kindness."

One person gave out free sandwiches after being nominated. Another person then gave out footballs to children.

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