App Flap: Phones with Flappy Bird game sell for thousands - New York News

App Flap: Phones with Flappy Bird game sell for thousands of dollars

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PHOENIX (KSAZ) -

It's an app called Flappy Birds -- a no-frills game that became wildly popular last month, but suddenly disappeared over the weekend.

The man who created the game is the one who pulled the app and it appears he may have been overwhelmed by its huge success.

Reports say the man who created it was making up to $50,000 a day through ad revenue from Flappy Birds and it was so popular that phones and devices that already have the free download -- that you can't get anymore -- are selling for thousands of dollars.

The Flappy Bird app soared to the top of the iTunes downloads last month, but on Saturday, the man who created it, killed the app and now people that have the app on their mobile devices are looking to cash in.

"Once the guy just took it off the market.. I don't know how it skyrocketed.  Stocks going up for this bad boy," said Danny Flynn.

Flynn says the frustrating game is simple and addicting.  You tap the screen to navigate a bird through an obstacle course.

"I don't know why the guy stopped making it.  I love this game," he said.

I had never played it until Monday and I learned it's not as easy as it looks.  But a lot of people can't get enough of it.

We went on Craigslist.org and did a quick search for Flappy Bird and found dozens of ads offering phones loaded with the app -- with prices from $1,500 all the way up to $10,000!

"I didn't believe it at first until I looked it up on eBay and actually saw people selling their phone for a lot of money," said Frank Melgar, who is selling his HTC phone with Flappy Birds installed. 

Melgar put his phone up for sale on eBay Monday and he's waiting for the bids to roll in.

"I wasn't surprised by its popularity -- because it's kind of an addicting game. But people paying thousands of dollars for it -- that's crazy," he said.

Flynn says he's already received a few offers for his phone.

"You know, who knows.. it could be worth a million dollars someday. I'm only asking for $3,000.  It's a bargain.  Yeah, exactly.. can't beat it," he said.

Here's a tweet from the Flappy Bird creator, Dong Nguyen:

"I can call Flappy Bird a success of mine.  But it also ruins my simple life.  So now I hate it."
@dongatory - Feb. 8

That may explain a little about why he removed the app from the iTunes store, but it's left a lot of people unhappy and may make others quite a bit of money.

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