NY curling club members have eyes on Olympics - New York News

NY curling club members have eyes on Olympics

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

From time to time, on a sheet of ice in the village of Ardsley, New York, one can hear the hearts of stones beating against each other.

"Curling has sort of a weird combination of being both graceful and wacky," Ardsley Curling Club member John Salmon said.

John and his wife Lynn cast their first curling stones after watching the sport on television during the 2006 Winter Olympics.

"We have people from 8 to 80 years old playing at this club," Lynn said.

They also have national champions playing on the same ice in the same matches as amateurs.

"We had the Olympic trials in November," 2012 USA Curling Champion Bill Stopera said, "and we finished third."

This year, Bill's 16-year-old son, Andrew, did him one better, taking second at junior nationals in Seattle.

"It's a sport where you can play against the best in the world one day," Bill said, "and then come back to the club and play with your friends the next."

"We played against him on Monday night," John said of Bill, "and we came this close to beating him."

The Scots invented curling in the Middle Ages. The state of Michigan opened the first American club more than 400 years later.

"Curling is typically a Midwestern sport," Bill said.

But we find pockets of rock-and-sliders in the Hudson Valley, on Long Island, even in the Fox 5 newsroom: reporter Robert Moses and meteorologist Carlie Buccola both curl.

"Some people might think it's more of a drinking sport where you don't have to be in shape," Andrew said.

Maybe those people, who don't throw stones, shouldn't insult those aiming for ice houses (curlers call their target "the house").

If you're looking to get involved, check out the club's open house series. The next one is on February 24.

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