DPD Officers say new health plan makes prescriptions too pricey - New York News

DPD Officers say new health plan makes prescriptions too expensive

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(WJBK) -

The new year means new health insurance changes for millions of Americans, including Detroit police officers. Some officers say, after the changes, they can no longer afford their prescription drugs.

Two Detroit police officers, who wished to remain unidentified, told FOX 2's Erika Erickson Wednesday that, despite the way things appear, something needs to change.

"Everybody is on TV saying morale is up; it's never been lower. We keep getting beat down and beat down and beat down. How long do you expect to us be beat down?" one of the officers asks.

The officers say after seven and 10 years serving on the force, changes of their health insurance effective January 1 left them feeling "worthless" and "unappreciated."

"The city said, this is your new insurance. If you do not sign up for it your dependents will not be covered."

One officer is a single parent and is now working two jobs. He says he spends $500 a month on insurance and prescriptions for his post traumatic stress and sleeping disorders.

"When you have killed people and have shot people and have had people die in your hands, when you look in someone's eyes as they die, that doesn't leave you alone," he says.

The second officer says she stopped paying $400 each month, choosing between her bipolar medication or what her children need.   

They say they, along with hundreds of other officers, are losing about 20 percent of their paychecks to pay for more expensive insurance with less coverage.

Erickson spoke with the vice president of the Detroit Police Officers Association, Bernard Cybulski. He says he gets calls every day from upset officers, and is working to get their old policy back by the end of their contract, hopefully by July 1.

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