FOX 32 takes a look into `selfie` psychology - New York News

FOX 32 takes a look into `selfie` psychology

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(Photo courtesy of the Whitney Young Pom Squad) (Photo courtesy of the Whitney Young Pom Squad)
(Photo courtesy of the Whitney Young Pom Squad) (Photo courtesy of the Whitney Young Pom Squad)
(Photo courtesy of the Whitney Young Pom Squad) (Photo courtesy of the Whitney Young Pom Squad)
CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

Facebook is flooded.

If it is touched on Twitter that means people like it.

And it just can't be ignored on Instagram.

"It" is the "selfie," the self-taken photographs that show off any and everything about you.

Yet, what does the so-called selfie say about someone's self-esteem?

FOX 32 talked to some teens about posting pictures and what an expert says about them.

Those photos will hit social media sites within seconds.

The selfie has become part of our culture, while most are supposed to be fun an expert says all of those pictures and post could be a snapshot of someone looking for attention.

"If I'm really bored I can take 15 selfies a day. If it's a busy day I can take like one," Whitney M. Young High School senior Lanae Plaxico said.

To "hanging with my friends," to "look what I'm wearing," pick up any teenagers phone and you'll see a selfie.

"Definitely when you get your hair done. You got some eyeliner on, some lip gloss, you popping, you flicking your eyebrows--eyebrows are the thing for me. My eyebrows are done, selfies are the game," Whitney M. Young High School junior, KiaMarie Barcliff, said.

"Selfies are just a way when you're just feeling good you just want to take a picture and let everybody know you're looking good. You post them if you like them," Whitney Young senior, Caitlyn Walker, said.

Experts say teenagers are posting pictures looking for reassurance.

They want to be told by friends and strangers on popular social media sites that they're "liked."

"A lot of people post things and want feedback because they don't have a real sense of value. They don't have a sense of confidence or a sense of worth and there's a certain level of narcissism that we all need to get through society and we need to have that to feel confident," Child Therapist, Denise Duval Tsioles, said.

But posting too many "selfies" on sites could be a cry for something else.

"It usually means something is going on for them. They're trying to fill a need for attention, maybe to bolster their self-confidence, they're looking for recognition or something like that. So we have to pay attention to that," Dr. Tsioles said.

Some of the girls on the dance team at Whitney Young say they're always snapping selfies because they are confident, and the coach helps them with that.

"They're smart, they're beautiful, they're talented so it's just more about making sure they space themselves on how fast they grow up," Whitney Young dance coach, Tonay Tucker, said.

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