Controversial candidate, Tio Hardiman, remains on primary ballot - New York News

Controversial candidate, Tio Hardiman, remains on primary ballot for governor

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

On Thursday, Governor Quinn abandoned efforts to knock a Democratic primary challenger off the March 18th ballot.

It removes one cloud from the candidacy of Tio Hardiman, a controversial former Executive Director of Cease Fire. However while one threat has been removed, another threat still hangs over Hardiman, which some may consider a big one.

Tio Hardiman told FOX 32 that a judge last month expunged from his record Hardiman's 1999 guilty plea to misdemeanor domestic violence, a charge filed by a former wife.

Hardiman also lost his job at Cease Fire after being arrested last May on another domestic violence complaint by his current wife, Alison.

She later dropped it.

Campaigning at Catfish Corner on the West Side, Tio Hardiman boasted he has the best record to run for governor, and told FOX 32 News voters should not be concerned about his domestic violence arrest record.

"Well, I'm not a convicted felon. I have no convictions in my background….But the thing is, I'm a good man. I've overcome a lot of obstacles in my personal life. And there's not one person in the entire world who doesn't have relationship issues. So, I'm not trying to be a perfect individual because I'm running for governor," Hardiman said.

He continued saying, "The thing is, most women that hear my message, I believe most women will be very receptive to me, because the thing is I'm human."

When Hardiman's current wife, Alison, asked to withdraw her domestic violence complaint last year, she told officials Hardiman had abused her verbally, but not physically.

"People have arguments. So, people are trying to hold me accountable for an argument I had. That's not right. My thing is, I'm a loving man. I didn't just wake up after 13 years and say, "I'm gonna verbally abuse my wife. You know, my wife will tell you the same thing. We're solid gold now, solid gold," Hardiman said.

Gov. Quinn also got a surprising boost Thursday, winning the endorsement of the Illinois AFL-CIO, which had bitterly denounced him for months for supporting a new law that reduced some future public employee pension payments.

After declining for several days to discuss the 1999 domestic violence case, Hardiman provided additional details on Saturday. He said the case was expunged on Dec. 12, 2013. Hardiman said that after he pleaded guilty to domestic violence in 1999, a judge sentenced him to probation, with the condition that if he committed no further offenses there would not be a conviction listed on his record.

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