COTS homeless shelter faces no heat, flooding during cold snap - New York News

COTS homeless shelter faces no heat, flooding during cold snap

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(WJBK) -

A local nonprofit that works to help the homeless is now asking for your help, after experiencing a loss of heat and ruptured piping during the recent cold snap.

The Coalition for Temporary Shelter's (COTS) CEO, Cheryl Johnson, explains the situation on the organization's website:

"The "Polar Vortex" has had a negative impact on COTS. Tuesday, January 7, the west side of our emergency shelter building was without heat due to frozen pipes. In order to ensure the safety and comfort of our guests was maintained, staff passed out additional blankets, scarves and space heaters. Additionally, a hot lunch was offered to anyone in the building.
The heat has since been restored.

Late Wednesday morning, January 8, some fire suppression system pipes on the second floor burst inside the walls affecting the second and main floors including the kitchen and some offices. While water has been contained, damages are still being assessed.Please know that all efforts have been made to ensure that guests are safe and no one has been displaced as a result of these issues.

As many have asked, "How can I help" the best assistance we can receive now is by way of financial contributions. As the agency does not have an abundance of discretionary funds to handle catastrophic situations of this nature, these issues place a huge strain on the organization. Any assistance provided will help us stay on course to do what we do best - alleviate homelessness!"

Donate online: www.cotsdetroit.org
Phone: (313) 831-3777

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