Ex-NYPD cops among workers charged in disability scam - New York News

Ex-NYPD cops among workers charged in disability scam

Posted: Updated:

JENNIFER PELTZ | AP

NEW YORK (AP) — Scores of retired New York City police officers, firefighters and prison guards were charged Tuesday with faking psychiatric problems to get federal disability benefits — with some falsely claiming their conditions arose after the Sept. 11 attacks, prosecutors said.

Four ringleaders coached the former workers on how to falsely describe symptoms of depression and other mental health problems that allowed them to get payouts high as $500,000, said Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. The ringleaders made tens of thousands in dollars in secret kickbacks, Vance said.

Among the retirees arrested were 72 city police officers, eight firefighters, five corrections officers and one Nassau County Police Department officer.

Investigators said the scam stretched back more than two decades, with the ex-officers and other workers collecting years' worth of benefits for citing mental health problems so severe that they couldn't work at all. The workers were coached on how to portray their problems, reporting that they were so psychologically damaged that they couldn't take care of themselves, prosecutors said.

Many of the officers legitimately had physical disabilities that would have entitled them to state disability pensions, but would not have entitled them to federal Social Security disability insurance, which requires a complete inability to work. Internal Affairs Chief Charles Campisi said many of the officers exaggerated their psychological trauma to gain the Social Security benefits. Most claimed post-traumatic stress disorder and many said it was because of the Sept. 11 attacks, he said. The NYPD has no information that they weren't actually working after the terrorist attack, just that they overstated the effect, he said.

One of the defendants who said he couldn't work taught martial arts. Another former police officer who claimed he couldn't leave the house worked at a cannoli stand at a street festival. Another claimed depression so crippling that it kept him house-bound but was photographed aboard a Sea-Doo watercraft.

Many said they could not use a computer but had Facebook pages, Twitter handles and YouTube channels, prosecutors said.

"The brazenness is shocking," Vance said.

More than 100 defendants were charged with crimes including grand larceny. Arraignments in the sweeping case began late Tuesday morning, with several of the defendants pleading not guilty and being released without bail.

Claims of government workers feigning injury to get disability benefits have been the focus of sprawling criminal cases before.

Over the last two years, 32 people were arrested in a probe into Long Island Rail Road employees who collected federal railroad disability benefits; at least two dozen have pleaded guilty. The workers allegedly claimed on-the-job injuries, only to be spotted later playing golf and tennis, working out, and even riding in a 400-mile bike race.

Joseph Gentile, an attorney who represents a former police officer, declined to discuss his case specifically. But he also represented one of the people charged in the railroad case, suggested such charges reflect a troubled system for reviewing and approving disability claims.

"A lot of the problems that occur here are because of systematic problems, not because of someone's criminality," he said. While some people may indeed exploit benefits, "by and large, people have a bona fide, legitimate medical injury. The question becomes: Is the medical problem or injury sufficient to sustain the claim for the benefits?"

___

Associated Press Writer Colleen Long contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,

  • Manhattan NewsManhattan NewsMore>>

  • NYPD Twitter hashtag backfires

    NYPD Twitter hashtag backfires

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 9:14 PM EDT2014-04-23 01:14:35 GMT
    An NYPD plan intended to better connect with the community seems to have backfired a bit. The police department asked its twitter followers to share pictures of themselves with New York City police officers using the hashtag "myNYPD." Some did share nice pictures, but others not so much.Some of the first pictures posted showed regular citizens standing with very friendly looking police officers.
    An NYPD plan intended to better connect with the community seems to have backfired a bit. The police department asked its twitter followers to share pictures of themselves with New York City police officers using the hashtag "myNYPD." Some did share nice pictures, but others not so much.Some of the first pictures posted showed regular citizens standing with very friendly looking police officers.
  • Airbnb fights NY attorney general's subpoena

    Airbnb fights NY attorney general's subpoena

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 7:06 PM EDT2014-04-22 23:06:24 GMT
    Renting out someone's apartment is an easy way to get an inexpensive place to stay if you're a tourist, and cheaper and more convenient than most hotels. But now the government is stepping in and trying to get a handle on a booming business that may not be playing by the rules. State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is squaring off in court with multi-million dollar Internet company Airbnb.
    Renting out someone's apartment is an easy way to get an inexpensive place to stay if you're a tourist, and cheaper and more convenient than most hotels. But now the government is stepping in and trying to get a handle on a booming business that may not be playing by the rules. State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is squaring off in court with multi-million dollar Internet company Airbnb.
  • Tavern on the Green to reopen with new owners, look, menu

    Tavern on the Green to reopen with new owners, look, menu

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 6:06 PM EDT2014-04-22 22:06:28 GMT
    The new Tavern on the Green is all about the details. From the sheep's head on the fireplace (an ode to Sheep Meadow across the way) to the gold leaf trim in the dining room, everything is a reminder that you're sitting in Central Park. Owner Jim Caiola and his life partner spent the last two years and $20 million redoing the inside of the iconic restaurant after it went bankrupt in 2009.The old-fashioned Crystal Room is gone but now there is a more modern-looking glass wall.
    The new Tavern on the Green is all about the details. From the sheep's head on the fireplace (an ode to Sheep Meadow across the way) to the gold leaf trim in the dining room, everything is a reminder that you're sitting in Central Park. Owner Jim Caiola and his life partner spent the last two years and $20 million redoing the inside of the iconic restaurant after it went bankrupt in 2009.The old-fashioned Crystal Room is gone but now there is a more modern-looking glass wall.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices