How to uncork champagne the right way - New York News

How to uncork champagne the right way

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The pop of the champagne cork is synonymous with New Year's Eve celebrations across the globe and a signal that the party is starting. But that pop you are hearing is apparently wrong.

We were was given a lesson on the proper way to uncork champagne, Prosecco and its close cousin cava by Michael Wells, a wine ambassador with City Wine Tours. He said the pop is the "tackiest thing ever" and that the sound should be more of an "angel's sigh," a slight little hiss.

Wells took us to Boqueria in Soho and broke out the bubbly. He said that for starters look for the pull tab, twist the cage to loosen it but leave the cage on to give you a firmer grip on the cork.

So now you basically have a live explosive in your hands. The pressure in a champagne bottle is typically between 70 and 90 pounds per square inch. That's two to three times the pressure in your car's tires, about the same as in a double-decker bus's tire.

This is what separates champagne pros from amateurs, according to Wells: Push down to give you all the control. Twist the bottle and feel the cork push into your hand while applying a downward pressure against it so you can control the opening.

Of course, champagne purists recommend "sabering" the cork off but if you don't have a cavalry sword, this method will liven up your New Year's safely.

One more tip: warm champagne is more volatile, so chill the bottle to about 40 degrees. Wells said that two hours in the refrigerator is perfect.

Wells said that opening up your sparking correctly ensures that more winds up in your glass. Cheers.

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