The making of a Super Bowl ring - New York News

The making of a Super Bowl ring

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By CHRISTAL YOUNG

MYFOXNY.COM -- You can't help but be drawn to the enormous display case. A magnifying glass slides along a track so you can get a better look at each ring.

Legendary coach Vince Lombardi helped design the first ring after the packers win in 1967.

Through the years, they've gotten larger and more impressive looking. Frank Supovitz, senior V.P. of events for the NFL, calls the rings a unique piece of Super Bowl memorabilia.

In 1999 just before Super Bowl 33 the NFL standardized the size and quality of the rings.

Former Giants punter Sean Landeta has two rings: from 1986 and 1990. He says he gets a kick out of watching people try them on, present company included.

The day I met Sean his 1986 ring was in the shop for repairs but he vows, neither will ever be sold or given away. Both of Sean's rings were made by the school ring company Balfour. But six of the more recent ones were created by Tiffany and Co.

Former Giants defensive end Michael Strahan was lucky enough to weigh in on the ring that would commemorate his team's win in 2008.

Creating just one Super Bowl ring can take up to a month. From a hand sketch to liquid gold being poured into a wax casting, let's just say the process is a team effort.

The real value of a super bowl ring is priceless, and while nothing beats a New York City parade it must be pretty nice to wear a piece of jewelry that constantly reminds you "That's right -- I'm a winner.

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