How to pick the right Christmas tree - New York News

How to pick the right Christmas tree

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The unmistakable smell of fresh pine needles is the signal that it is time to buy a tree! And there is a lot to know about getting a healthy tree without getting ripped off.

First you have to know what kind of tree you're looking for. Fraser firs with the blue tinted underside and balsam fir trees are the most popular.

"Fraser firs retains needles," said Jacob Pelletier, Hicks Nursery in Nassau County. "The balsams give you more of a fragrance but it's doesn't retain needles as long."

The most important factor in a trees pricing is where you buy it. On the Upper East Side an 8-foot tree was between $100 and $150.

Whole Foods has them for $50.

Home Depot in the suburbs has them for about $40.

At a cut-your-own Christmas tree farm, an evergreen will often cost about $100 -- you're paying for the experience.

No matter where you get your holiday tree make sure it's thriving. When you grab the needles, they shouldn't come off in your hand.

Use that chainsaw to remove two inches from the original cut. That will remove sap so the tree can drink all that water you'll be giving it.

When you do find the right tree, you better hope Santa approves.

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