PCH cooling technique helps keep babies healthy - New York News

PCH cooling technique helps keep babies healthy

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PHOENIX -

It's a whole body cooling technique used to help heal babies -- specifically babies who suffer a lack of oxygen before or during birth.

That lack of oxygen can cause of number of different health conditions.

About 175 families will get together Saturday morning and celebrate life and talk about this cooling treatment that's helped keep their babies healthy.

It was a life changing moment for this valley family.  Little Zoe was born 10 months ago and needed the whole-body cooling technology and constant monitoring at Phoenix Children's Hospital.  She had suffered a lack of oxygen during birth and the treatment helped restore her to total health.

"They lay on a cool blanket.. a blanket that has water running through it.  That the temp is modulated by a machine that measures the temperature of the baby's core through the feeding tube in the esophagus," said Cristina Carballo, medical director of PCH's neuro intensive care unit.

It was a wild 70 days in the hospital for the family.  Zoe was under 24 hour monitoring.  It's critical because the lack of oxygen can cause the condition H.I.E., which affects three out of a thousand full term births.   H.I.E. can cause cerebral palsy, learning disabilities and epilepsy -- which can be deadly.   Until recently, there was no treatment for H.I.E.

"Babies who like Zoe who have moderate encephalopathy have a 30 percent chance of cerebral palsy.  We've reduced that to 6 to 8 percent," said Carballo.

A technique that's helped give one little girl a chance at life.

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