GIVE TO THE MAX: Minnesota's day of giving gets generosity going - New York News

GIVE TO THE MAX: Minnesota's day of giving gets generosity going

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Many Minnesotans got out the checkbook for Give to the Max Day -- but some of them hit some snags when it came time to click their pick for charitable donations.

The 24-hour donation blitz is a chance for Minnesotans to donate to their favorite non-profits and team up with organizations that will match the gift.

Starting at 12:01 a.m. on Nov. 14, the charitable clock started ticking. In the next 24 hours, Minnesotans came together in collaborative giving.

"You can give on givemn.org any day if the year," says executive director Dana Nelson. "But on Give to the Max Day, we've got over $6 million in matching funds."

Yet, heavy traffic crashed the site at about 1 p.m., and the outage persisted until roughly 6:30 p.m.

Before the crash, thousands of donors had responded to Give to the Max Day, raising more than $9 million by noon.

Augsburg College was among the many anxious nonprofits cranking out emails to supporters by late afternoon.

The Star Tribune reported more than 30,000 donors had responded before the site crashed.

Last year the day raked in more than $16 million for 4,400 charities and schools.

Minnesota was the first to launch a statewide giving day 5 years ago. Since then, other states have followed the lead.

For many non-profits, Give to the Max Day is something they depend on.

To donate: www.givemn.org

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