DFCS head answers questions about 2 children's deaths - New York News

DFCS head answers questions about 2 children's deaths

Posted: Updated:
ATLANTA -

The head of Georgia's Division of Family and Children Services said there are many lessons to be learned from the recent deaths of two young children.

Dr. Sharon Hill says more work must be done before she can determine exactly what went wrong in the screening process for Emani Moss and Eric Forbes. She did say it's clear that more training is necessary if the agency is going to keep other victims of abuse safe.

Hill said the two deaths weigh heavily on the hearts of those at the agency.

"I will be holding myself accountable. I'm holding my staff accountable," Hill said.

For years before his murder in mid-October, teachers reported their suspicions that 12-year-old Eric Forbes was being abused. Eric's father is now charged in Paulding County with the boy's murder.

The body of 10-year-old Emani Moss was found burned and stuffed in a trash can outside of her Lawrenceville apartment last Saturday. Her father, Eman Moss, and stepmother, Tiffany Moss, have been charged in her murder. Authorities said she appeared to have died of starvation.

The summary report of Emani's lengthy history with DFCS details years of abuse. Loved ones, teachers and an anonymous tip all expressed concerns that the little girl was being physically and emotionally abused by her father and stepmother. While one investigation led to Tiffany Moss's arrest on child cruelty charges, other cases were closed or screened out for a lack of evidence or even a lack of an address for her parents.

"What I know so far and what I've learned so far when I look at this is that maybe a continued emphasis on our part about training our staff," Hill said.

Following Emani's murder, critics have said the agency needs to do a better job of screening for what's called predictors for violence and abuse.

"I absolutely agree with that. I need to do everything possible to ensure that my staff are well trained, that they are able to detect any potential signs of abuse," said Hill.

As part of its mission statement, DFCS says no child shall die in vain.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices