So-called anti-rape underwear in development - New York News

So-called anti-rape underwear in development

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Two women started a line of clothing called AR Wear, or Anti Rape Wear. The women posted a campaign online to try to raise money for their venture.

It features women's underwear and running shorts that have a strap around the waist and thighs that you can lock. The pitch: the garment can help protect you from a sexual assault. The company claims an attacker won't be able to cut or break through the garment.

The designers write on their website:  "We developed this product so that women and girls could have more power to control the outcome of a sexual assault. We wanted to offer some peace of mind in situations that cause feelings of apprehension, such as going out on a blind date, taking an evening run, 'clubbing', traveling in unfamiliar countries, and any other activity that might make one anxious about the possibility of an assault."

The AR Wear is getting criticism. Talia Hagerty, with an organization called Stop Street Harassment, says the ad makes it sound as though women have control over whether they're attacked.

"The challenge is to find a way to prevent people from committing rape, not to give women another reason to feel it's our responsibility if we're raped," Hagerty says.

The creators of the Anti-Rape Wear declined an on-camera interview but told Fox 5 that did say that they do not believe the products blame the victim.

As of Friday morning, they had raised about 80% of the $50,000 they were seeking to bring their product to market.

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