MINNEAPOLIS MAYORAL RACE: Ranked choice voting, explained - New York News

MINNEAPOLIS MAYORAL RACE: Ranked choice voting, explained

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MINNEAPOLIS (KMSP) -

The quest to become mayor of Minneapolis features one particular nuance this year that's causing some voters' heads to spin -- this is the first time ranked choice voting is in place now that 35 candidates are in the race.

Election officials hope for fewer delays than last year, but there's plenty of voters who have never even heard of ranked choice voting.

The city of Minneapolis has a website with a video tutorial on how this all supposed to work, and sample ballots have been handed out like Halloween candy allowing voters to get familiar with the process.

See a sample ballot: http://vote.minneapolismn.gov/rcv/sample

WHAT IS RANKED CHOICE VOTING?

RCV is a way of voting that eliminates the need for separate primary elections. Voters rank up to three candidates for each municipal office. Each ballot has three columns and voters complete the ballot from left to right, indicating their first choice for each race in the first column, and a second and third candidate if they wish.

HOW ARE VOTES COUNTED?

On election night, the first choice votes for all candidates are counted. If a candidate receives enough votes to win, or the "minimum threshold of support," he or she is elected. For the mayoral race, the candidate needs more than 50 percent the total votes to win.

If no candidate receives enough votes, counting ensues to eliminate the candidate with the fewest votes and continues until one candidate has enough votes to win. For example, if Bob the candidate has the smallest number of first-choice votes, he's cut. The second-choice votes on Bob's ballot are redistributed to the remaining candidates.

Or, a non-political example...

You have $1 to buy your favorite candy bar. If the candy bar only costs $.60, you get to put the other $.40 toward your second favorite candy bar.

In any RCV race, your second and third choices don't harm your first choice. Your second and third choices only count once your first choice is elected or defeated.

MAYORAL CANDIDATES

Mark V. Anderson
Merrill Anderson
Mark Andrew
Neal Baxter
Troy Benjegerdes
Alicia K. Bennett
Edmund Bernard Bruyere
Bob ‘Again' Carney Jr.
Jackie Cherryhomes
Christopher Clark
Dan Cohen
James Everett
Bob Fine
Cyd Gorman
Mike Gould
Kurtis W. Hanna
John Leslie Hartwig
Betsy Hodges
Gregg A. Iverson
Bill Kahn
Jaymie Kelly
Tony Lane
Doug Mann
Abdul M. Rahaman "The Rock"
Joshua Rea
Don Samuels
Ole Savior
Captain Jack Sparrow
James "Jimmy" L. Stroud, Jr.
Jeffrey Alan Wagner
John Charles Wilson
Cam Winton
Stephanie Woodruff
Rahn V. Workcuff
Christopher Robin Zimmerman

VOTING TOOLS

Polling place finder: http://pollfinder.sos.state.mn.us/

See if you're registered to vote: https://mnvotes.sos.state.mn.us/VoterStatus.aspx

How to register on election day: http://www.sos.state.mn.us/index.aspx?page=204

ELECTION DAY NOV. 5

Even with new voting machines and software brought in to count votes faster, election officials say it will take a few days to tally all the votes, so we shouldn't expect to know the results on election night, unless a candidate clears the 50 percent threshold on the first count.

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