New study puts heat under immigration debate - New York News

New study puts heat under immigration debate

Updated:

By: Emmilie Buchanan-Whitlock, Deseret News

Immigration reform could lead to a boost in the economy, according to a new study from Bipartisan Policy Center.

"The report found that during the next 20 years, immigration would bolster the country's economic growth by 4.8 percent. The report shows that immigration reform would reduce the country's deficits by $1.2 trillion during this time, as young working immigrants take jobs and pay taxes," according to U.S. News & World Report.

The new report comes during a heated debate on immigration reform on the Hill, as well as the arrival of business leaders from more than 40 states visiting the Capitol to lobby for reform, according to the U.S. News article.

"The (policy center) report pushes back against some anti-reform advocates who argue immigration reform would take jobs away from able-bodied Americans and drive wages down," U.S. News reported.

"What we've learned through the Bipartisan Policy Center study is that strong immigration will result in strong economic growth," said Becky Tallent, director of immigration policy for the center, in a press release. "Our country has always been a beacon for entrepreneurial, hard-working individuals. It is imperative that we continue to attract these individuals to ensure future prosperity and labor market strength."

However, reform may very well not happen this year. Even key legislator Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who helped draft the immigration compromise that is currently before the House, has recommended rejection of the bill, according to the Los Angeles Times.

"Meanwhile Rep. Jeff Denham, who represents a heavily Hispanic district around Modesto (Calif.), has made peace with his Democratic colleagues to push passage of the Senate bill," the Times reports.

The article said passing the bill would be a "no-brainer" because of the benefits it would bring to the economy.

According to the L.A. Times, "The Congressional Budget Office says (the bill) would increase employment, boost capital investment, raise the relative wages of people now working in the underground economy ... (and) reduce the federal deficit."


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Copyright 2013 Deseret Digital Media, Inc.

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