Victim hit by light rail talks device distraction dangers - New York News

Victim hit by light rail talks device distraction dangers

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PHOENIX -

A valley woman is making a remarkable recovery two years after being hit by a light rail train in Denver.

She says she was listening to her iPod and looking at her phone when she was hit. Now, she's trying to spread the word about the dangers of being distracted.

The last time we talked with Laura Triem, she was in a wheelchair. We had to use subtitles because you couldn't understand what she was saying. But that's no longer the case.

Not only is she walking and talking clearly now, she's taking her message to the airwaves. She's walking, talking and eating.

Doctors did not expect Laura Triem to make this remarkable recovery.

"I still have trouble tying my shoes," says Laura.

The 23-year-old was hit by a light rail train in Denver two years ago. She was listening to music and likely looking down at her phone.

"I don't want to think I wasn't looking at my phone, I probably was."

Laura doesn't remember a thing about that day, or the following. She was in a coma for 13 days.

"On the plane I didn't know if she was alive or dead," says Mary Chadwick, Laura's mom.

Laura's mother, who flew to Denver, says she first saw her daughter like this: "One side of her skull was removed, then it turned out the swelling was still too much so they had to remove the other."

November 4th will mark the two year anniversary of Laura's accident.

"Awesome, just to be this far in recovery and doing as well as I am, walking and talking and eating," says Laura. She had to relearn all of it.

Laura still keeps up with a firefighter who came to her rescue after she was hit. He's now invited her to be part of a televised public service announcement about the dangers of being distracted. She plans to go back to Denver next month to shoot it.

"Even if it's just one person we can help that would be worth everything Laura's gone through," says Mary.

"I really want to tell kids and young adults that safety and awareness of where you're at is very important to know," says Laura. "Now my life is changed because of it and I would not want that on anyone else."

Laura's family is hoping to start a "Laura's Look Up and Live" Foundation to provide helmets to people in need. Her mother also plans to work with lawmakers to get pedestrian rails put up at the light rail.

Now that Laura's walking, her next goal is to run. She plans to go back to school too.

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