100 Pound Pumpkin Returned To Little Boy - New York News

100 Pound Pumpkin Returned To Little Boy

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What began as a crime has turned into a story about compassion and community, and in the process a young boy's faith in humanity is restored.

9-year-old Jaiden Newcomer was attending the Windsor Township Oktoberfest. He entered a contest to guess the weight of a Great Pumpkin.

Jaiden didn't expect to win, but lucky enough he guessed it right on the dot — one hundred pounds.

But he only had the giant pumpkin for about a week before someone took it, and last night he came home to this:

"I'm really sorry about taking your pumpkin it was wrong of me, you earned the pumpkin. I didn't think my actions through nor realize who they were affecting. Sincerest apologies," reads the apology letter.

Jaiden found that note attached to his 100-pound pumpkin Sunday night.

Jaiden's father tells us his son cried a little bit when he first realized someone took it because the prize was a big deal to him.

"That's the first time it happened to me, the first time I won something," says Jaiden Newcomer.

It surprised his parents that someone managed to steal the pumpkin because of its size.

"Amazed that someone actually took it off the front porch without being seen without making any noise, without waking anybody up," says Amy Newcomer, Jaiden's mom.

So many people heard of Jaiden's story and wanted to help him, so besides this original pumpkin he won he also received a 55-pounder.

And on top of those two he now has an exact replica of the original pumpkin.

If you're counting that's 255 pounds of pumpkin, but he's not keeping it all for himself.

"I'm going to donate them to children that can't afford pumpkins," says Jaiden.

But he's holding onto the pumpkin he won.

He plans to carve it but into exactly what he's keeping a secret.

Jaiden says he has no hard feelings toward the person or people who stole his pumpkin.

"Thank you for giving me the pumpkin back it's very thoughtful of you," says Jaiden.

When we asked Jaiden if he was angry, he told us this:

"I would a little bit (be angry) but I'll forgive them," says Jaiden.

Besides donating those two pumpkins to charity, Jaiden is also asking for people to donate pumpkin pies to ‘Our Daily Bread' in York. He hopes he can help collect 100 pies.

Jaiden asks that if you plan on donating to Our Daily Bread you tell them it's from "Jaiden's Pumpkins".

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