Still no sign of Avonte; reward increased for autistic boy - New York News

Still no sign of Avonte; reward increased for autistic boy

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Family members of Avonte Oquendo, 14, joined the Rev. Al Sharpton at his Harlem headquarters on Saturday in a rally to draw attention to the search for the missing autistic boy. They thanked New Yorkers for their support but said more needs to be done.

Sharpton is contributing $5,000 to the reward fund for Oquendo who has been missing since Oct. 4 when he walked out of his New York City school.

The reward for Avonte's safe return was up to $89,500 as of Saturday, including Sharpton's donation.

A search party set out Saturday from a tent in front of Avonte's school in Long Island City, Queens.

Daniel Oquendo Sr. asked everyone to keep their eyes open for Avonte and to "keep praying for us."

Sharpton said his National Action Network would help.

Oquendo is 5'3" tall and approximately 120 lbs.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 

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