DA Ferman Analyzes Fla. Bullying Case - New York News

DA Ferman Analyzes Fla. Bullying Case

Posted: Updated:

The parents of the 14-year-old accused bully went on national TV and defended their daughter and themselves. Police say that their daughter wrote a Facebook post saying that she knows she bullied Rebecca Sedwick, but she doesn't care that she committed suicide. However, her parents say that her Facebook account was hacked. It is a claim police aren't buying.

"Watch what your children do online. Pay attention. Quit being their best friend and be their best parent," said Sheriff Grady Judd. Sheriff Judd also mentioned yesterday that they may charge the parents too.

Should the parents be charged? What should schools be doing? Many viewers following the case have questions, so Good Day asked Risa Vetri Ferman, the Montgomery County District Attorney, to join us this morning.

DA Ferman provided her expert opinion on this situation.

"It is hard to answer the question 'should parents be charged,' but parents need to be aware. And I think a lot of it depends upon the specific evidence down in Florida," DA Ferman told FOX 29.

DA Ferman explains that in the juvenile system, girls can be charged criminally if appropriate. However, it is more important to use this Florida tragedy to raise awareness about bullying and have parents take responsibility in teaching their kids how to behave toward their peers.

Ferman compared it to teaching your kid to drive a car. No parent will just give their kids the keys to a car. You have to set rules and teach your kid how to use the equipment properly. The same goes for the Internet. Parents must set restrictions and make sure their kids browse cyberspace safely. It really starts at home, Ferman emphasized.

With social media, bullying does not stop when the child gets home. It can be relentless, as seen by the case in Florida. No longer can parents of students being bullied take their kids out of school and guarantee an end to the harassment.

"There has to be a call for parents to pay attention," advised Ferman. Parents of the bullies and the school must proactively step in, she repeated.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Six Flags Great Adventure plans new roller coaster

    Six Flags Great Adventure plans new roller coaster

    Thursday, August 28 2014 7:28 AM EDT2014-08-28 11:28:03 GMT
    New Jersey's Six Flags Great Adventure plans to build a new roller coaster for 2015.  The theme park announced on Thursday Looping Dragon will join the park's other thrill rides. The park says 24 riders sitting in face-off seats will pitch forward and backward pendulum-style until the ride completes a full revolution seven stories in the air. Riders will be suspended upside down and then the ride will reverse direction.
    New Jersey's Six Flags Great Adventure plans to build a new roller coaster for 2015.  The theme park announced on Thursday Looping Dragon will join the park's other thrill rides. The park says 24 riders sitting in face-off seats will pitch forward and backward pendulum-style until the ride completes a full revolution seven stories in the air. Riders will be suspended upside down and then the ride will reverse direction.

  • Rocket from Wallops Island seen in NJ

    Rocket from Wallops Island seen in NJ

    Thursday, August 28 2014 7:17 AM EDT2014-08-28 11:17:55 GMT
    NASA is reviewing data from a rocket launch that tested a new sub-payload deployment method for suborbital rockets. NASA says a Black Brant IX suborbital rocket was launched at 5 a.m. Thursday from the agency's Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The new deployment method uses small rocket motors to eject sub-payloads from a rocket's main payload. Thursday's test included releasing vapor traces in space.
    NASA is reviewing data from a rocket launch that tested a new sub-payload deployment method for suborbital rockets. NASA says a Black Brant IX suborbital rocket was launched at 5 a.m. Thursday from the agency's Wallops Island Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The new deployment method uses small rocket motors to eject sub-payloads from a rocket's main payload. Thursday's test included releasing vapor traces in space.
  • Hurricane Cristobal to move toward north Atlantic

    Hurricane Cristobal to move toward north Atlantic

    Thursday, August 28 2014 7:11 AM EDT2014-08-28 11:11:47 GMT
    Hurricane Cristobal is expected to move rapidly toward the north Atlantic, staying away from Bermuda and passing south of Nova Scotia. The hurricane's maximum sustained winds early Thursday are near 75 mph (120 kph) with no significant change in strength forecast over the next two days. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Cristobal is centered about 285 miles (460 kilometers) northwest of Bermuda and is moving northeast near 29 mph (46 kph).
    Hurricane Cristobal is expected to move rapidly toward the north Atlantic, staying away from Bermuda and passing south of Nova Scotia. The hurricane's maximum sustained winds early Thursday are near 75 mph (120 kph) with no significant change in strength forecast over the next two days. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Cristobal is centered about 285 miles (460 kilometers) northwest of Bermuda and is moving northeast near 29 mph (46 kph).
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices