Lane Tech football game honors critically injured player - New York News

Lane Tech football game honors player fighting for his life

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Drew Williams Drew Williams
Courtesy: CPSfanDotCom Courtesy: CPSfanDotCom
Courtesy: CPSfanDotCom Courtesy: CPSfanDotCom
Courtesy: CPSfanDotCom Courtesy: CPSfanDotCom
CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

Lane Tech varsity football player Drew Williams remains hospitalized after collapsing on the field last week.

Though, he can't be with his team for the last game of the season, his teammates, friends, and family are in attendance to play and pray for him.

"My parents are more than appreciative of everyone's support," Williams' sister Andrea said at a Friday press conference. "There was prayer held this morning and he was able to breath today. I absolutely don't think it's a coincidence so I know everyone's been tweeting #PrayforDrew and it was trending on Twitter. We just think that type of support is important."

"It was a little strange not seeing him on the field because I'm used to seeing him play the game and do well," Drew's brother Bryce said during the game.

Bob Pasternak and other players' parents wore "Drew in our hearts" shirts while students held signs in support of the young football star who collapsed on the sidelines last week. He remains hospitalized and in critical condition after reportedly suffering a brain injury.

"My son has played with Drew on the varsity for the last four years and he's great kid and we just want to show support to the family by wearing the shirt," Bob Pasternak says. "I also coach so there's always that worry that there may be an injury and somebody can get hurt so you always have that in the back of your head so you just pray for the best."

"We're holding a Drew sign right here," one mother, Jen Kwasinkski, told FOX 32. "Our middle son is on the sophomore team and he plays with Bryce, Drew's brother."

 

Online websites have popped up garnering support for the Lane Tech football star who's injury has touched the community and complete strangers.

"It's a sad story," says Foreman student Zabrieya Easley. "All the Foreman kids that are coming today have heard about it. We wish him the best of luck."

Friends, family, and total strangers are doing their best to make sure Williams' family is not overwhelmed with medical bills. A fundraising website has brought in $32,000 so far.

If you'd like to donate to the fundraiser, visit the site here.

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