DC officer hit by gunfire killed Navy Yard shooter - New York News

DC officer hit by gunfire killed Navy Yard shooter

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WASHINGTON -

Three weeks after Aaron Alexis killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard, there are new details surrounding his death at the hands of police.

FOX 5 has learned the D.C. police officer who was hit by gunfire and saved by his protective vest is the same officer who opened fire on Alexis and killed him.

A little over an hour after the IT contractor went on a rampage inside Building 197, he was gunned down by two police officers who opened fire simultaneously.

Multiple law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation say D.C. police officer Dorian De Santis shot Alexis along with an as yet unnamed U.S. Park Police officer.

The two were surprised by Alexis as they searched an office on the third floor.

At 9:25 a.m. on September 16, an hour and nine minutes after Aaron Alexis shot his first victim, an urgent report came over the police radio.

"Return fire, you've got an MPD officer down! Okay we've got an MPD officer down on the third floor.”

Multiple law enforcement sources familiar with the investigation say that officer was Dorian De Santis, who had just been hit in the chest.

He was surprised by Alexis, who suddenly popped up from behind an office cubicle on the third floor and opened fire with the handgun he had taken from security guard Richard "Mike" Ridgell.

De Santis is a member of the emergency response team and was dressed in body armor as he searched the building with another officer from the U.S. Park Police.

"I think you would have to be inside the building to fully appreciate its size and all of the places Alexis could have been hiding. I think the chief described it as a tactical nightmare for first responders," said FBI Assistant Director Valerie Parlave at September 24th news conference.

According to multiple law enforcement sources, De Santis had his tactical rifle on automatic and opened fire simultaneously with his partner.

It was an end to an assault that claimed 12 lives and created incredible challenges for the officers involved.

"Their actions once they got inside the building, the thought they put into ensuring other teams could get in, other teams could get in quickly, that other teams could move around safely was unbelievable … There were multiple engagements with the suspect with multiple agencies before the final shots were fired," said D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier.

One of those engagements involved K9 officer Scott Williams, who was shot in both legs as he too was surprised by Alexis, while searching the building with three other officers.

Alexis began his rampage with a shotgun carried into the building in a backpack.

FOX 5 reached out to Officer De Santis, but he declined to comment. Chief Lanier also declined to comment.

U.S. Park Police have not released the name of the officer who also opened fire on Alexis and a spokesperson said there is no timeframe to do so.

Scott Williams is now recuperating at home.

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