Ventra cards mean changes for CTA & Pace riders - New York News

Ventra cards mean changes for CTA & Pace riders

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CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

A new way to pay.

"Introducing Ventra, a new contactless payment system for CTA and Pace. Ventra is convenient and simple," said a YouTube video posted on Ventra's website.

The video shows how the new technology works.

Chicago, "Gone are the days of carrying multiple cards and excess cash and change… And down the road, right from our compatible smart phone," touts a narration in the YouTube video.

"This is so much more convenient to just beep you know, just go your way, as fast as you can, quick," said Teresa Hwngbo.

Hwngbo is one of nearly a million people who have already made the switch one month into Ventra's rollout.

FOX 32's Tisha Lewis reports the change prompted by new technology and frustration with an antiquated system continually breaking down.

"The machine that we have that services Chicago card and the magnetic stripe card, that's out of order, a lot of our machines are out of order. They're actually not making some of the technology and the parts for that anymore and that's actually why we are switching to Ventra," said Tammy Chase, a Chicago Transit Authority spokesperson.

Chase showed FOX 32 News the new Ventra machines already up and running at the Brown Line station in Lincoln Square and others across the city.

"Ventra system is the new system that's more modern and accepts more forms of fare payment," said Chase.

Though there are some complaints with the new technology including online registration and Ventra machines not recognizing Ventra cards.

"Lily" posted a picture on Twitter complaining about not being able to load money on her Ventra card.

Extra workers will be out at rail stations this week to work out any kinks and answer questions.

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