Eco-fashion: Fish and plastic bottles becoming clothes - New York News

Eco-fashion: Fish and plastic bottles becoming clothes

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PHOENIX -

Fish and fashion. Not something you would expect to go together. But a designer featured in Phoenix Fashion Week is turning fish into leather. She's also turning water bottles into fabric.

It's called eco fashion.

The designers rarely make new fabric -- instead they repurpose old designs and they create products that can be washed instead of using harsh dry cleaning chemicals.

Jennifer Lynn deserves a round of applause for her efforts to change an industry that can tend to go over the top.

"There's paper waste from fabric making... there's things that go in the trash after they're cut," says Lynn, designer and owner of Linden.

The emerging designer makes an effort to cut back on waste.

"Traditional leather is made from chromium and it's toxic and harmful to the environment."

Jennifer now uses fish leather. The tanning process only requires hot water, and the fish are farmed so the entire animal is used. Part is eaten and another part becomes fashion.

"As opposed sometimes in traditional leather, they raise the animal for leather and not for food," says Lynn. "I go to a big warehouse in Los Angeles that buys tons of extra fabric from every major company in the fashion industry."

The LA-based designer even recycles water bottles to create clothing.

"But when the plastic is already made it uses less petroleum, it uses less water and uses less carbon," says Lynn. "There are ways to cut back and there ways to not pollute so much and also not give up your luxury."

You got to wonder what it feels like to wear a fish or a water bottle!

The fish used to make clothing are farmed specifically for human use and none are endangered. Even the sewing machine at the Linden Factory runs on natural gas.

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