Laser therapy for allergies a controversial treatment - New York News

Laser therapy for allergies a controversial treatment

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PHOENIX -

It's a controversial treatment for allergies not covered by insurance, costing patients hundreds of dollars. The treatment is flourishing in Arizona, but is illegal in some states.

Shana Prewitt's two sons suffer from allergies. Her youngest Kasen had food allergies so bad he stopped eating.

"He ate a piece of popcorn one time accidentally and he threw up for six days," she says.

Prewitt is a nurse, and had faith medicine would take care of her sons. When she didn't see results, she turned to a controversial treatment. Chiropractor Dylan Foster uses laser therapy to treat allergies.

"I just took a leap of faith. I brought my son in here. Three hours after his first treatment he was able to eat dairy," says Prewitt.

Foster says this box transmits frequencies corresponding to allergies. The cold laser then calms the body.

"If you expose someone to something they are fighting and don't like, while they are exposed to that fight, you relax them. That fight is now subdued and relaxed," says Foster, owner of Advanced Chiropractic and Allergy Relief.

The only problem -- medical doctors warn there's no scientific evidence the laser treatment actually works.

After getting complaints in California, the state's Board of Chiropractic Examiners banned the treatment altogether.

"When you have a treatment you have the placebo effect. 30 percent of people will respond to treatment even if it does nothing," says Dr. Duane Wong, allergy immunology specialist.

"If someone is better I don't care what's doing it, I don't care if I give them a sugar pill. They use that in medicine to test the placebo effect… I highly doubt that's case with the success rate I have here," says Foster.

Foster says he has a nearly 100 percent success rate.

"The evidence is in the people, the evidence is in the patients that come in here."

Patients like Prewitt, with a lot of faith and no scientific proof keep coming back.

"Had I not seen it with my own two eyes I don't think I would have believed it. That hard scientific brain of mine would have gawked at it. No, having seen it I'm a true believer, it works, truly works."

I talked to the Arizona Board of Chiropractic Examiners. The investigator there told me in Arizona there's been zero complaints over the lasers being used to treat allergies, and since they haven't gotten complaints, the board hasn't taken a position on it.

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