Blind swimmers make history on Alcatraz swim - New York News

Blind swimmers make history on Alcatraz swim

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PHOENIX -

An amazing feat over the weekend. Three people from here in the valley faced the choppy waters of the San Francisco bay to become the first blind swimmers to make the swim from Alcatraz Island to the shore.

The race started on Alcatraz. They swam to the foot of the Hyde Street Pier, that's 1.25 miles.

Matt Ashton and Tanner Robinson took a big leap -- and this one of extreme faith.

This is video taken of their trip swimming from Alcatraz in San Francisco to the shoreline. Every stroke is with help from guides -- because the two are blind.

"Helps to have the support and talk about doing a bunch of things at once. They would call out to each other like he's going left and try to get him back on course, or something like, this is how far we've come you're doing great keep going," says Tanner Robinson.

Savannah Daoust is one of those guides who trained with Matt and Tanner here at home in Arizona. The training was strenuous and many weeks long.

"For the past couple months we've been swimming around pools, gyms, swimming at Lake Pleasant has been really helpful trying to get a sense of open water," says Matt Ashton.

The training is nothing new though. Because for these two testing the limits has become somewhat common.

"Four years ago Tanner and I did the summit at Mount Kilimanjaro and the next year we did rim to rim in a single day and Alcatraz was just the next adventure to go on."

The next adventure -- college.

Matt just graduated from Brophy. Tanner is a recent graduate of Arizona State University -- a proud Sun Devil.

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