Detroit's 'City Year' nonprofit loses annual grant, among others - New York News

Detroit's 'City Year' nonprofit loses annual grant, among others

Posted: Updated:
DETROIT, Mich. (WJBK) -

Non-profits across Detroit rely on city funding to get their jobs done. Agencies thought their funding was a done deal for this year, until recently when the emergency manager made some changes. Some agencies got more money and others' funding was completely cut off. One of those agencies that lost its money is Detroit's 'City Year' branch.

The city has given City Year Detroit a community block grant for the past 12 years. Executive Director Penny Bailer thought this year was no different. "We're very conservative. We don't plan unless we are sure the money is going to be there," she tells Fox 2's Alexis Wiley. The nonprofit has Americorp members in 11 schools throughout the city. "They serve from 7 in the morning to 5:30 at night, tutoring and mentoring the kids; being positive role models; being coaches and mentors," Bailer explains.

This year.city council awarded City Year Detroit an $89,000 grant. But months after being awarded the grant the city has now taken it away. The emergency manager's office, with the help of consultants and the Department of Planning and Development, changed the funding structure.

"There was apparently a public hearing which we were not notified of. And dozens of agencies were not notified. It was very quickly done, and I don't even how they failed to send out an email," Bailer says.

"It's unfortunate that we didn't communicate it better, but we really have to focus on how we can get those services and that money into the community in a much more efficient way," Bill Nowling tells Wiley. Nowling is the spokesperson for Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr. He says by cutting the number of recipients the city can cut down on administrative cost and make sure the money continues to support nonprofits who are making a difference in the city.

Meanwhile, organizations like City Year Detroit are left with a large hole to fill and need that's even greater. "I never dreamed the emergency manager would get involved in something that's already been completed. Work on next year's criteria! We've all been through so much to get this far. We've hired people and started the school year. Why go back and change it after the fact?" Bailer says.

City Year Detroit and other nonprofits can still apply for a grant next year, but until then, will have to fundraise to make up for what they've lost.

For more information on City Year Detroit, click here.

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • PETA protests Central Park horse-drawn carriages

    PETA protests Central Park horse-drawn carriages

    Thursday, April 24 2014 6:08 PM EDT2014-04-24 22:08:12 GMT
    Chanting the mayor's name in appreciation, some 50 demonstrators protested horse-drawn carriages in the city on Thursday. The protest was organized by PETA and NYCLASS after a horse fell on the corner of 5th Avenue and 59th Street Wednesday. The protestors said the horse was spooked by a bus and cited witness accounts who shot some video. The horse that fell is 15-year-old Spartacus.
    Chanting the mayor's name in appreciation, some 50 demonstrators protested horse-drawn carriages in the city on Thursday. The protest was organized by PETA and NYCLASS after a horse fell on the corner of 5th Avenue and 59th Street Wednesday. The protestors said the horse was spooked by a bus and cited witness accounts who shot some video. The horse that fell is 15-year-old Spartacus.
  • Superstorm Sandy

    NYU Langone unveils rebuilt emergency room

    NYU Langone unveils rebuilt emergency room

    Thursday, April 24 2014 5:54 PM EDT2014-04-24 21:54:40 GMT
    A year and a half after Superstorm Sandy hit New York, a major city emergency facility that was destroyed finally fully reopened Thursday — with waterproof walls. Gov. Andrew Cuomo joined Mayor Bill de Blasio and other dignitaries to celebrate the emergency complex at the NYU Langone Medical Center, which is now triple the size of the old one and equipped with the latest technology.
    A year and a half after Superstorm Sandy hit New York, a major city emergency facility that was destroyed finally fully reopened Thursday — with waterproof walls. Gov. Andrew Cuomo joined Mayor Bill de Blasio and other dignitaries to celebrate the emergency complex at the NYU Langone Medical Center, which is now triple the size of the old one and equipped with the latest technology.
  • Princeton University giving town $24M

    Princeton University giving town $24M

    Thursday, April 24 2014 5:33 PM EDT2014-04-24 21:33:55 GMT
    Princeton University has agreed to contribute more than $24 million over the next seven years to the town of Princeton. The deal was announced Thursday and is set for consideration by the town government's approval on Monday. The university and town officials frame it was as a way to resolve an age-old issue in college towns where much of the land is university-owned and thus tax-exempt.
    Princeton University has agreed to contribute more than $24 million over the next seven years to the town of Princeton. The deal was announced Thursday and is set for consideration by the town government's approval on Monday. The university and town officials frame it was as a way to resolve an age-old issue in college towns where much of the land is university-owned and thus tax-exempt.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices