Victory for California Cyclists: Riders Get Their Three-Foot Ru - New York News

Victory for California Cyclists: Riders Get Their Three-Foot Rule

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Hundreds of bicyclists are hit by cars each year in Los Angeles. Now, there's a new law to better protect them to prevent these types of accidents.

Cyclist Mark Jacobs knows how dangerous it is to share the road with cars,  "I've been hit twice, once over the hood of a car, once on Pacific Coast Hwy."

But now two wheeled pedal pushers will have more space.

Governor Jerry Brown signed the three foot rule, making it a law for motorists to drive at least 36-inches from cyclists while passing, or slow down to a safe speed.

Jacobs says, "that extra three feet would help tremendously, a car is considered a deadly weapon."

It's a big victory for cyclists. The governor rejected previous versions of the bill that didn't prohibit cars from swerving across the double solid yellow lines in the middle of the street. This law makes it illegal for a car to veer left over the lines.

Cyclist Diego Benetina says, "it just makes the road safer you can feel more comfortable riding your bike I think more people will start riding their bike to work."

Even some motorists in car centric LA agree, like Tatiana Urquiza, "if it makes everybody safe why not it's a place where everyone commutes to, it's community, we should make space for everyone.

The law would take effect next year in order to make sure drivers and cyclists have time to learn about the new law. California joins nearly two dozen other states with similar laws.

The base fine would cost $35 dollars but could reach up to $220 dollars if a motorist hits and injures someone on a bike.

 

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