Victory for California Cyclists: Riders Get Their Three-Foot Ru - New York News

Victory for California Cyclists: Riders Get Their Three-Foot Rule

Posted: Updated:

Hundreds of bicyclists are hit by cars each year in Los Angeles. Now, there's a new law to better protect them to prevent these types of accidents.

Cyclist Mark Jacobs knows how dangerous it is to share the road with cars,  "I've been hit twice, once over the hood of a car, once on Pacific Coast Hwy."

But now two wheeled pedal pushers will have more space.

Governor Jerry Brown signed the three foot rule, making it a law for motorists to drive at least 36-inches from cyclists while passing, or slow down to a safe speed.

Jacobs says, "that extra three feet would help tremendously, a car is considered a deadly weapon."

It's a big victory for cyclists. The governor rejected previous versions of the bill that didn't prohibit cars from swerving across the double solid yellow lines in the middle of the street. This law makes it illegal for a car to veer left over the lines.

Cyclist Diego Benetina says, "it just makes the road safer you can feel more comfortable riding your bike I think more people will start riding their bike to work."

Even some motorists in car centric LA agree, like Tatiana Urquiza, "if it makes everybody safe why not it's a place where everyone commutes to, it's community, we should make space for everyone.

The law would take effect next year in order to make sure drivers and cyclists have time to learn about the new law. California joins nearly two dozen other states with similar laws.

The base fine would cost $35 dollars but could reach up to $220 dollars if a motorist hits and injures someone on a bike.

 

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • New York's smallest piece of private land

    New York's smallest piece of private land

    Thursday, July 31 2014 8:52 PM EDT2014-08-01 00:52:57 GMT
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
    The Hess triangle is a tiny piece of private property in Greenwich Village. Manhattan historian Joyce Gold explained the origins of the property: After World War I, New York City seized a beautiful residence and tore it down so it could extend Seventh Avenue and the west side subway below it. The city left the building's owner only a tiny scrap of property so small it requested he donate the triangle to make way for a sidewalk. The man refused, took the city to court and won.
  • Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Runners of 3,100-mile race in Queens seek spiritual experience

    Thursday, July 31 2014 7:26 PM EDT2014-07-31 23:26:44 GMT
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
    Since mid-June, 14 runners have been on a mission that is spiritual at its core. They are running the Self-Transcendence 3,100 Mile Race in Jamaica, Queens. Spiritual leader and former Queens resident Sri Chimnoy, who died in 2007, created the race, which lasts 52 days.
  • Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Road-trip vacations that don't break the bank

    Thursday, July 31 2014 5:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 21:37:29 GMT
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
    Last-minute vacations don't need to be a headache or ridiculously expensive, especially if you make it a road trip. Even if you don't have a car, renting one can be an affordable option.Lauren Lyons Cole, a personal finance contributor to TheStreet.com, has some suggestions.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices