Rollie Chance wrongly identified as Navy Yard shooter - New York News

Rollie Chance wrongly identified as Navy Yard shooter

Posted: Updated:

As crowds gathered today to remember those who lost their lives at the Washington Navy Yard, the tragedy will also have a lasting impact on one Virginia man.

In the midst of the developing news last Monday, NBC and CBS posted tweets incorrectly labeling former Navy Chief Petty Officer Rollie Chance as the possible shooter.

CBS also named him over the radio. It led to retweets from various other news operations and journalists. The outlets ended up retracting their reports and Chance is now calling for an apology.

He says the ordeal has turned his life upside down and terrified his family. "When I leave the house, I'm looking over my shoulder. The biggest thing is, I was afraid my daughter would hear about this without me being around her to explain what's going on. I was afraid my daughter would have found out her daddy was dead when in reality he wasn't because it was a mistake." Chance says he is mourning the loss of several former co-workers killed in the shooting.

However, instead of attending the memorial at the Navy Yard, he chose to stay home with his family, out of the spotlight. Chance is not the first person to be wrongly named a suspect by the media.

Several news organizations settled with Richard Jewell after linking him to the Atlanta Olympics bombing in 1996, and just last year the brother of the shooter in Newtown Connecticut was mistakenly named as the suspect.

Chance says he wants assurances that it will not happen again saying, "Verify before you vilify someone. Check and recheck."

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • Congressman's ad includes Soviet medals

    Congressman's ad includes Soviet medals

    Friday, August 22 2014 8:38 AM EDT2014-08-22 12:38:06 GMT
    A New Jersey congressman's office is red-faced after a Facebook ad about veteran benefits that appeared to feature Russian military medals.
    A New Jersey congressman's office is red-faced over a Facebook ad about veteran benefits that featured Soviet military medals. Rep. Scott Garrett's spokeswoman said in an emailed statement that the office was sorry an initial review did not catch the use of the stock photo. Maggie Seidel says the ad was produced by an outside vendor and is no longer running. The ad asked people to like Garrett's page to learn what he's doing to support veterans' benefits.
  • Torture video leads to kidnapping convictions

    Torture video leads to kidnapping convictions

    Friday, August 22 2014 8:00 AM EDT2014-08-22 12:00:26 GMT
    A jury shown the videotaped torture of a kidnapping victim has convicted the two men who held a man captive for 17 hours at a Buffalo home because they thought he was a police informant. Authorities say the two men kidnapped a 25-year-old crack addict they accused of being a snitch. Video from Dawson's cellphone shows a gun being shoved into the victim's mouth and the victim being forced to lick his own blood off the boot of a captor.
    A jury shown the videotaped torture of a kidnapping victim has convicted the two men who held a man captive for 17 hours at a Buffalo home because they thought he was a police informant. Authorities say the two men kidnapped a 25-year-old crack addict they accused of being a snitch. Video from Dawson's cellphone shows a gun being shoved into the victim's mouth and the victim being forced to lick his own blood off the boot of a captor.
  • 17,000 red light camera tickets dismissed

    17,000 red light camera tickets dismissed

    Friday, August 22 2014 7:39 AM EDT2014-08-22 11:39:23 GMT
    A technical glitch in a red light camera operating system means that some 17,000 motorists in New Jersey will not have to pay a fine for running red lights. Computer problems between May 28 and June 30 resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations. New Jersey law requires that if a ticket hasn't been served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
    A technical glitch in a red light camera operating system means that some 17,000 motorists in New Jersey will not have to pay a fine for running red lights. Computer problems between May 28 and June 30 resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations. New Jersey law requires that if a ticket hasn't been served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices