Man Says Warrant Served At Wrong Address, Wants Door Fixed - New York News

Man Says Warrant Served At Wrong Address, Wants Door Fixed

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PHILADELPHIA -

A disabled Philadelphia man coming home to find his door has been kicked in, but his home hasn't been ransacked.

It turns out it wasn't burglar who had been inside his home. He says it was the police. FOX 29's Kelly Hessedal has his story.

"It's not just me hurting. My whole family is hurting right now," said 53-year-old Mark Jamison.

His home a mess. The front door kicked in. Some of his belongings missing. The rest scattered everywhere. Jamison says what he came home to Thursday was devastating.

"But I still got to be strong. Don't nobody live here, and I don't have no help. I'm on a fixed income. It's no time to start breaking down," Jamison said.

He put the pieces of the puzzle together after finding a search warrant sitting on table. According to it, the narcotics unit executed a search warrant at this address looking for two people Jamison says he's never met, never heard of.

"No, I don't. I don't have a clue," he said.

Jamison who admits he's had his own trouble with the law before says this has nothing to do with him. And he just moved into this home a year ago.

He says neighbors told him the two police were after may have been previous tenants.

"I'm mad as hell. But I still have to keep control," Jamison said.

He shared his anger with police. On Friday, officers took a report and advised Jamison to file a complaint with the city.

Though Lt. John Stanford can't comment on the specific case because it's under investigation, he admits, mistakes like this have happened before.

"We do our due diligence to try and make sure that the address that we have is an accurate address," Stanford said. "But it can happen where you have an address in which the individual no longer resides at that location.

Jamison, now left to clean up the mess, says at the very least he just wants his door fixed.

In addition to filing a complaint with the city, Jamison also has to file a complaint with the city's Office of Risk Management to try and get reimbursed. We're told there's no timeframe on how long it might take for all of this to play out, Hessedal reported.

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