Big Yellow Ducky Spreads Happiness And Draws Crowds - New York News

Big Yellow Ducky Spreads Happiness And Draws Crowds

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KAOHSUING, Taiwan -

Rubber duckies make bath time much better, but one rubber ducky in Taiwan is just too much for one bath tub. It's floating in a harbor!

The giant yellow rubber duck is attracting thousands to Kaohsiung's harbor. Why is this inflatable animal traveling the world? to spread happiness.

At least that's according to the iconic duck's creator:

"I think this yellow dot of joy just is irresistible, you know. I was looking at it again and I already saw it for 12 years and it keeps on smiling to you. It says: 'don't you worry, laugh, be happy,' and fantasize also.' Because I think having this big rubber duck… it changes also your fantasy and your brain. And it's a piece of art," says Florentijn Hofman.

The duck will remain in Kaohsiung until October twentieth before traveling to other locations in Taiwan.

City officials hope their special guest will attract some three million visitors and generate tens of millions of dollars in revenue.

So far the rubber ducky and its various cousins (Hofman has created quite a few of different sizes) have been to 14 cities: Baku, Azerbaijan; Beijing, China; Hong Kong, China; Sydney, Australia; Hasselt, Belgium; Onomichi, Japan; Auckland, New Zealand; Osaka, Japan; São Paulo, Brazil; Saint-Nazaire, France.

Despite aiming  to spread happiness, the duck occasionally gets negative reception from some area residents. One ducky was stabbed 42 times in Hong Kong by a vandal, according to CNN, while on display in 2009. Also the Chinese Government briefly banned search terms related to the yellow ducky, when a Chinese artist photoshopped the duck into the infamous Tank Man photo.

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