Bloomingdale's tightens return policy - New York News

Bloomingdale's tightens return policy

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Department store chain Bloomingdale's has introduced three-inch plastic tags that attach to visible spots on a dress that cost  $150 or more in an effort to crack down on return fraud.

Once the so-called b-tag is removed, the dress is non-returnable.

The move is in a effort to stop 'wardrobing,' a term used to refer to shoppers who return worn items.

Retailers lost an estimated $8.8 billion last year to 'wardrobing,' and other return fraud, according to the National Retail Federation.

According to a 2012 survey, wardrobing – the return of used, non-defective merchandise like special occasion apparel and certain electronics – is a huge issue, with nearly two-thirds (64.9%) saying they have been victims of this activity within the last year.

On its site, Bloomindale's writes: "Certain dresses will be delivered with a Bloomingdale’s b-tag attached. Once the b-tag is removed, merchandise cannot be returned. To determine whether a dress you would like to purchase will be tagged, go to the product page and review the details tab below the image. If an item is going to be tagged, we will alert you there."

The upscale retailer says it will not accept return of merchandise that has been worn, washed, damage, used or altered.


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