Spanish city seeks lottery winner who lost ticket - New York News

Spanish city seeks lottery winner who lost ticket

Posted: Updated:

By JORGE SAINZ

MADRID (AP) — A Spanish city is seeking a missing millionaire.

Somebody bought a lottery ticket in the town of La Coruna that won 4.7 million euros ($6.3 million) — but lost the ticket in the shop. After failed attempts to track the winner down, the city is now making a public plea for the buyer to step forward. Fortune hunters beware: Anybody trying to claim the prize will have to prove that they know where and when the ticket was purchased.

The ticket for the June 30, 2012 drawing was found in one of the city's authorized lottery agency outlets by another customer, who handed it to the manager of the store. The manager informed authorities, who are now publicizing the story to get leads.

The city this week released an official notice about the ticket on its website list of lost-and-found items such as cellphones, keys and wallets.

"I'll be the first Spanish mayor who's searching for a millionaire not to ask for money but to give it," La Coruna Mayor Carlos Negreira joked in a statement.

Authorities are not revealing where the ticket was bought or the time of purchase so that they can question people claiming to be the owner, and try to determine whether they're telling the truth. Like many Spanish cities, La Coruna has dozens of lottery outlets.

Many people in Spain play their own series of numbers, so people will also be questioned about their lottery playing history and what numbers they usually choose. However, it's also possible that the ticket purchaser paid for a ticket with random numbers generated by the lottery machine.

La Coruna, population 246,000, is an international tourism destination so the ticket could also very well have been bought by a visitor.

Prizes for small lottery winnings can be claimed at lottery agencies, but bigger amounts like the jackpot for the lost ticket must be claimed at regional lottery headquarters.

La Coruna is required by law to try to find the winner: An 1889 Spanish statute states that municipalities must safeguard lost winning lottery tickets and make every effort to find the legitimate buyer.

The search will last for two years — and if the owner of the ticket doesn't show up the jackpot goes to the person who found it.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Summary

  • Local NewsLocal NewsMore>>

  • August 23, 2014

    Staten Island march traffic and transit advisory

    Staten Island march traffic and transit advisory

    Friday, August 22 2014 3:07 PM EDT2014-08-22 19:07:48 GMT
    The NYPD and the MTA have announced road and transit changes for Staten Island that will be in effect on Saturday, August 23, 2014, due to the scheduled rally in honor of Eric Garner, the Staten Island man who died during an arrest.
    The NYPD and the MTA have announced road and transit changes for Staten Island that will be in effect on Saturday, August 23, 2014, due to the scheduled rally in honor of Eric Garner, the Staten Island man who died during an arrest.
  • 1990 arson-murder rap tossed, Queens man is set free

    1990 arson-murder rap tossed, Queens man is set free

    A former New York businessman whose arson-murder conviction was overturned in the death of his daughter was freed from prison Friday after 24 years behind bars, following a judge's ruling that the case against him had been based on now-debunked arson science.
    A former New York businessman whose arson-murder conviction was overturned in the death of his daughter was freed from prison Friday after 24 years behind bars, following a judge's ruling that the case against him had been based on now-debunked arson science.
  • Sanitation men nearly throw away mayor's piano

    Sanitation men nearly throw away mayor's piano

    Friday, August 22 2014 1:39 PM EDT2014-08-22 17:39:56 GMT
    A piano donated by Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop nearly ended up pushing up daises in a landfill instead of making music in a pedestrian plaza. Fulop gave the upright so residents could play tunes in a pedestrian plaza that opened on Monday.
    A piano donated by Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop nearly ended up pushing up daises in a landfill instead of making music in a pedestrian plaza. Fulop gave the upright so residents could play tunes in a pedestrian plaza that opened on Monday.

Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices